Company launches first ‘beardvertising’ network

Updated 27 May 2013
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Company launches first ‘beardvertising’ network

KENTUCKY: A company has launched the first ‘beardvertising’ network. The concept allows individuals with an “epic beard” to use it as advertising space for a charge, Metro reports. The Kentucky-based advertising agency Cornett-IMS is offering men “up to $ 5 per day” to wear the clip-on adverts.
Their website reads: “Do people stare at its awesomeness? Of course they do. “Do you wanna get paid for having an epic beard? Join the world’s first Beardvertising network. “It’s simple — turn your beard into a business. Hang a BeardBoard (Patent Pending) in your beard. Sit back and get paid up to $ 5 per day.” “I think it’s the next big thing,” company executive Whit Hiler told Business Insider.
“Everybody loves beards. We’re getting a ton of emails from guys with epic beards that want to host beardboards and we’re actually in talks with some brands that want to be Beardvertisers. “I think we’ll probably be seeing some ‘beardboards’ in the wild before too long.


Amputee Sumatran tiger gives birth to cubs

Updated 22 January 2019
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Amputee Sumatran tiger gives birth to cubs

  • The gender of the two cubs is yet to be determined
  • There are less than 400 Sumartan tigers remaining in the wild as they are losing their habitats to deforestation

PADANG-LAWAS, Indonesia: A Sumatran tiger with an amputated paw has given birth to a pair of cubs in Indonesia, amid fears for the future of the critically endangered species.
Gadis — whose name means girl in Indonesian — delivered her babies at the Padang Lawas conservation area in North Sumatra about a month ago, conservationists say.
The tiger mom has been undergoing rehabilitation since her paw and part of her leg were amputated two years ago after getting caught in a trap for catching wild boars.
“Gadis... has now recovered and is healthy, giving birth to the two cubs,” said reserve head Parta Basmeli Siregar.
The sex of the two cubs has not yet been established, he added.
Sumatran tiger births are rare and the species is considered critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.
There are fewer than 400 left in the wild and environmental activists say they are increasingly coming into conflict with people as their natural habitat is rapidly deforested.