Malala in Makkah for spiritual solace

Updated 30 May 2013
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Malala in Makkah for spiritual solace

Malala Yousafzai, the teenage Pakistani girl who was shot in the head and critically wounded by militants last year for promoting girls’ education, arrived yesterday in the Kingdom with her family to perform Umrah.
Her visit was kept low-profile and it garnered little attention until she met Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Sheikh Mohammad bin Zayed Al-Nahyan in the UAE on her way to Jeddah.
“This is a private visit to the Kingdom dedicated toward performing Umrah,” said Malala’s father, Ziauddin Yousafzai.
“Malala is keen on performing several Umrahs during her visit and wishes to spend time alone in the Haram Al-Sharif,” he told Arab News.
He said: “She is authoring a book and attending school. She has to prepare for her exams and therefore was not able to meet more people.”
Officials at the Pakistan Consulate in Jeddah said they were unaware of the details of her visit.
Malala, 15, stopped in Abu Dhabi on Monday to thank Sheikh Mohammad and the UAE government for sending an air ambulance and medical team to transfer her to the United Kingdom from Pakistan after she was shot last Oct. 9.
She then continued her journey to Makkah on Tuesday.
She was released from Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham in January and returned to school last month.
Malala, who became an activist at the age of 12, has become a global symbol for the campaign for girls’ rights to an education prior to the assassination attempt in the Swat Valley.
Her father is also an activist, having founded the all-girls Khushal Public School 17 years ago to encourage female leadership.
In March, she signed a $ 3 million book deal with Little Brown publishers to tell her life story. It will be published in November.
The teenager did not provide an interview because she is under contract by the publisher.


The rights Saudi women did not know of

Updated 25 April 2018
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The rights Saudi women did not know of

  • Since the launch of Saudi Vision 2030, the Saudi Justice ministry has addressed all flaws in the system that prevented women from living their lives securely and free from unnecessary hassles
  • No marriage agreement is accepted unless a woman provides a written approval, even if her guardian is her father

JEDDAH: Despite the great steps taken by the Saudi Ministry of Justice to give women a freer and more secure life, many Saudi women still do not have enough knowledge of their rights. 

Therefore, the ministry has started a campaign in cities all over the Kingdom to spread awareness among women of their legal rights. A female-only staff runs public exhibitions to enlighten them about how they are protected in different areas so they can lead their lives in a better way.

“We are using every possible channel to communicate with women to enlighten them about their rights, support them in all aspects to assure their ability to enjoy a secure rightful life,” said Majed Alkhamis, head of media and communication at the Ministry of Justice.

Since the launch of Saudi Vision 2030, the ministry has addressed all flaws in the system that prevented women from living their lives securely and free from unnecessary hassles. Despite all the obstacles, the ministry has succeeded in several areas.

A wife’s rights

The system not only grants the woman the right to sue her husband or ex-husband for alimony or acknowledgment of paternity, but it also allows any women legally living on Saudi soil, regardless of her citizenship or religion, to prosecute her current or former husband even if he is outside Saudi Arabia at the time of the lawsuit. Moreover, the new systems now support divorced women to a whole new level. For example, the system gives priority to a woman’s alimony over her husband’s personal debts.

Marriage agreements

No marriage agreement is accepted unless a woman provides a written approval, even if her guardian is her father. This arrangement grants a woman the freedom to accept a marriage proposal without any influence or coercion. In addition, if a woman is not happy with her marriage, she is free to leave the house of marriage and walk out of the agreement with no law to force her to come back. If she chooses to abandon the marriage her right to alimony will be dropped, but she is still entitled to custody of the children.

No delays

The Ministry of Justice has designed a full female service within its courthouses. 

These services include advisory people who provide free consultations on everything. In addition, these departments support women at all stages up until the execution of any court order to avoid delays and procrastination.

Speedy justice

The law emphasizes the speedy execution of justice in women-related cases.