Study to link SIM cards with fingerprints

Updated 20 June 2013
0

Study to link SIM cards with fingerprints

Linking a SIM card’s number with a customer’s fingerprints could be the latest attempt at eliminating anonymous usage of SIM cards. Saudi Call Company and a French company intend to file an integrated study into this possible solution with the Communication and Information Technology Commission (CITC). The procedure would replace the current one that demands registering the ID number or the iqama (residence permit) number for expats.
The study includes other possibilities, such as linking all parties concerned with the computers of communication providers, CITC, labor and passport offices.
“Event though linking the SIM card number with that of the national ID or iqama greatly contributed to regulating the market, and eliminated the bulk of the black market for SIM cards, some dealers can still bypass these procedures,” said Ibrahim Al-Sheikh, chairman of Saudi Call Company.
To bypass current regulations the names of expats or visitors who left the country were exploited. Their iqama or ID numbers stayed linked with the SIM cards.
Arab News field reports made clear at the time when the regulations were implemented that a black market had emerged where SIM card numbers were sold with the ID or iqama numbers.
Sultan Al-Malik, spokesman of CITC, said that the market of prepaid SIM cards rebounded last week despite the fines and penalties of up to SR 25 million that might hit illegal marketers of the commodity. “These fines could double in case the violation is repeated,” said Al-Malik.
Any person who buys a SIM card knowing that it is registered in the name of someone else will be regarded as a character impersonator and will be subjected to sanctions and penalties.
“The violating shops will be referred to municipalities, while individuals, if expats, Labor and Passports offices are bodies of jurisdiction in these cases,” concluded Al-Malik.


YouTube, under pressure for problem content, takes down 58 mln videos in quarter

Updated 14 December 2018
0

YouTube, under pressure for problem content, takes down 58 mln videos in quarter

  • Google added thousands of moderators this year, expanding to more than 10,000, in hopes of reviewing user reports faster

WASHINGTON: YouTube took down more than 58 million videos and 224 million comments during the third quarter based on violations of its policies, the unit of Alphabet Inc’s Google said on Thursday in an effort to demonstrate progress in suppressing problem content.
Government officials and interest groups in the United States, Europe and Asia have been pressuring YouTube, Facebook Inc. and other social media services to quickly identify and remove extremist and hateful content that critics have said incite violence.
The European Union has proposed online services should face steep fines unless they remove extremist material within one hour of a government order to do so.
An official at India’s Ministry of Home Affairs speaking on the condition of anonymity on Thursday said social media firms had agreed to tackle authorities’ requests to remove objectionable content within 36 hours.
This year, YouTube began issuing quarterly reports about its enforcement efforts.
As with past quarters, most of the removed content was spam, YouTube said.
Automated detection tools help YouTube quickly identify spam, extremist content and nudity. During September, 90 percent of the nearly 10,400 videos removed for violent extremism or 279,600 videos removed for child safety issues received fewer than 10 views, according to YouTube.
But YouTube faces a bigger challenge with material promoting hateful rhetoric and dangerous behavior.
Automated detection technologies for those policies are relatively new and less efficient, so YouTube relies on users to report potentially problematic videos or comments. This means that the content may be viewed widely before being removed.
Google added thousands of moderators this year, expanding to more than 10,000, in hopes of reviewing user reports faster. YouTube declined to comment on growth plans for 2019.
It has described pre-screening every video as unfeasible.
The third-quarter removal data for the first time revealed the number of YouTube accounts Google disabled for either having three policy violations in 90 days or committing what the company found to be an egregious violation, such as uploading child pornography.
YouTube removed about 1.67 million channels and all of the 50.2 million videos that were available from them.
Nearly 80 percent of the channel takedowns related to spam uploads, YouTube said. About 13 percent concerned nudity, and 4.5 percent child safety.
YouTube said users post billions of comments each quarter. It declined to disclose the overall number of accounts that have uploaded videos, but said removals were also a small fraction.
In addition, about 7.8 million videos were removed individually for policy violations, in line with the previous quarter.