Lanka envoy honors top students

Updated 23 June 2013
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Lanka envoy honors top students

The need to expose children to other cultures and religions for peaceful co-existence among all members of the society was strongly stressed by the guest speaker at the graduation ceremony of the Sri Lankan International School, in Riyadh on Friday.
The keynote speaker was the new Sri Lankan Ambassador Vadivel Krishnamoorthy, who honored the 39 graduating students.
“It gives me great pleasure to congratulate all of today’s graduates as they step out into the world to pursue their dreams. Today’s celebration of achievement should also celebrate those students who have achieved a priceless level of performance. This moment should serve as an opportunity for motivation,” Kirshnamoorthy said.
“Children require an exposure to cultures and religions other than their own. It is only then that they will appreciate the value of unity in diversity; to respect other religions and cultures while practicing and respecting their own,” the envoy said, adding that a cocooned existence could place them at a major disadvantage.
“It could be a recipe for conflict and unhappiness,” the envoy said.
As the future leaders of the world, he said, the ability to respect and cooperate with all should be translated into all your endeavors. “A substantial number of children in the Sri Lankan International School will leave Saudi Arabia some day and head toward a life either in Sri Lanka or in some other country. You will be taking up positions of leadership. It is here that you must remember to apply the values you learned.”
In his opening speech, School Principal S.M. Nazeer highlighted that the school has reached the milestone of 25 years of service to the Sri Lankan community in Riyadh. “During its existence, the school has produced several intellectuals and professionals in different fields of study. The school has seen a steady rise in its student population on a yearly basis. During 2012, the school produced more than 10 students enrolled in medical faculties across various universities around the world.

Apart from that, many students were admitted to universities in different fields of study.”
Before concluding his speech, the principal appealed the graduates to use their education to pursue noble causes and extend a helping hand to the students who are in need of their valuable services. He further implored the students to make today a better tomorrow and become useful citizens, while valuing the teachers and parents who were behind their success and bestowing upon them due gratitude.


Saudi aviation academy to train first women pilots

Updated 16 July 2018
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Saudi aviation academy to train first women pilots

DAMMAM: A flight school in Saudi Arabia is opening its doors for women, following the end of a decades-long driving ban in the deeply conservative Muslim country where many social restrictions are easing.
Oxford Aviation Academy, a leading trainer and crew recruiter, has already received applications from hundreds of women hoping to start lessons in September at a new branch in the eastern city of Dammam.
“People used to travel abroad (to study aviation), which was difficult for women more than men,” said applicant Dalal Yashar, who aspires to work as a civil pilot.
“We are no longer living in the era were women were allowed (to work) in limited arenas. All avenues are now opened for women. If you have the appetite, you have the ability,” she said.
The academy is part of a $300 million project that includes a school for aircraft maintenance and an international center for flight simulators at the airport.
Students receive three years of academic and practical training, said executive director Othman Al-Moutairy.
A decades-long ban on women driving was lifted last month, as part of sweeping reforms pushed by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman aimed at transforming the economy and opening up its cloistered society.
The lifting of the prohibition was welcomed by Western allies as proof of a new progressive trend in Saudi Arabia, but it has been accompanied by a crackdown on dissent, including against some of the very activists who previously campaigned against the ban.