Oman’s dwindling heritage of pottery

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Updated 26 June 2013
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Oman’s dwindling heritage of pottery

Oman has a rich tradition in pottery and Bahla occupies a place of pride in the region.
The art of pottery dates back to as early as 2500 BC. The invention of the potter’s wheel has tremendously influenced the development of our culture and civilization. So much so that ancient pottery today is considered to be an important relic in the studies of archaeology and social anthropology.
Yet unless the Omani government takes action, the pottery traditions and culture will fade into oblivion
The traditional pottery trade is dwindling though a few pottery units have remained in Bahla. At one time, scores of families in Bahla were trying to perpetuate the craft, but today there are only a few left. The souq has only limited items.
On my recent visit to Bahla I sneaked into a pottery unit in the heart of the town. Outside, a slab of clay, trampled upon by men hours before, was tanning in the sun. At another place the soil was left to soak in shallow water-filled pits secured by nets. These ensure that dried leaves and other dirt would not get mixed in with the clay.
Zaid Abdulla Hamdan Al-Adawi, the proprietor of the pottery unit, was seen stacking up the earthenware in the courtyard of his shed. When I queried him about the clay, he said that the brown clay is extracted from the wadi (riverbed) in Bahla while the red clay comes from mountains in the Bahla Wilayat. He did not seem enthusiastic when he observed: “Traditional pottery is a dying art now. Until about eight years ago, pottery was still a thriving trade. People now opt for plastic containers over our earthenware. A small section still prefers our items and for them we survive.” Zaid works from his electrically operated pottery wheel amid the accouterments of the trade. From the finished items I could make out that pottery is not confined to utility and economic purposes alone. It has developed into an aesthetic and quintessential art form.
Zaid’s shed is a clutter of water pitchers, pots, vases, frames, storage urns and decorative objects. Though the methods for producing potteries have changed, especially kilns (ovens) and firing techniques, Zaid still practices pottery the traditional way, completely unaffected by the changing times and trends. Except that he uses the electric wheel over the kick wheel.
Watching the clay being transformed as Zaid’s hands seem to weave patterns in the air seeing shapes and sizes emerge, along with spouts and rims as the fingers mold and curve, makes for a fascinating sight. Within minutes the contours of a pot appear. Zaid uses the old way, yet he is aware of the needs of the tourists and art collectors. Therefore, he is attempting to innovate by incorporating new design and motifs on his earthenware.
The items do not come cheap these days. I bought a very small water pitcher with an interesting mechanism for OMR 2 (SR 19.50). In this magic jug, water can be filled from the bottom and poured out only through the beak. Amazingly, it does not spill out when in an upright position.
The pieces, which adorn the spaces of the shed, have aesthetic appeal and a smooth finish. A frame with a picture of a coffee pot, all in clay, speaks of the creativity of Zaid. But unless the Omani government comes to the rescue of the dying craft, people like Zaid will continue to be a victim of ‘survival of the fittest’.

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Winners of prestigious photography award announced at Riyadh forum

Colors of Arabia held an event to honor artists in Riyadh. (Photo/Supplied)
Updated 14 December 2018
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Winners of prestigious photography award announced at Riyadh forum

  • Colors of Arabia forum held under the patronage of SCTH President Prince Sultan bin Salman

RIYADH; The Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) has announced the winners of the Prince Sultan Bin Salman Photography Award in four categories.
Winners of the prestigious award, which was launched to recognize budding talent and efforts to highlight the Kingdom’s heritage, received SR300,000 each and shields at a ceremony held at the Colors of Arabia forum under the patronage of Prince Sultan bin Salman, SCTH president.
The forum, which is being held at Riyadh’s International Convention and Exhibition Center, spans 15,000 square meters and is expected to have attracted 30,000 visitors by the time it ends on Sunday.
The award for the “pioneers” category, which recognizes the work of Saudis who have successfully contributed to the development of local artists, was won by a photographer in Hafr Al-Batin who began capturing day-to-day life in the Eastern Province city at only 12 years of age. The work of Jarallah Al-Hamad is now used in government brochures.
The award in the “literature and publications” category, which was open to contenders of any nationality both within and outside the Kingdom, recognizes photographers who have captured shots for publications and the film industry. Amin Al-Qusayran, a photographer and graphic designer from Madinah who began pursuing his passion 15 years ago, had previously won two awards in recognition of his work. Al-Qusayran is also author of a pictorial book shedding light on the Prophet’s Mosque in Madinah.
The “civilized heritage” category, meanwhile, was open to photographers from around the globe seeking to preserve world heritage through the power of image.
The award for this category was jointly won by two photographers of Arab descent. Mohamed Bouhsen, from Bahrain, had left university to document national heritage in his country and the Arabian Peninsula at large. He won the award alongside Jalal Al-Masri, an Egyptian photographer who has taken part in 133 local, Arab and international exhibitions.
The STCH also announced the winners of the photo and short film awards in seven categories.
Mazen Flamban, who won the award in the “cultural heritage” category, expressed his surprise and joy at having had his work recognized.
“My ambition is to revive Hijazi heritage through my lens,” Flamban told Arab News. “This was the first year I joined the competition. My photo depicts an old woman who lives alone as she reminisces over old photos.”