Sewage networks in Jeddah very poor

Updated 21 July 2013
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Sewage networks in Jeddah very poor

An estimated 70 percent of Jeddah neighborhoods lack sewage networks, according to Iyad Al-Husseini, head of the action team of water and sewage networks project for the protection of environment in Jeddah.
He said the infrastructure is worn out, and 70 percent of the neighborhoods are not connected to sewage networks.
Al-Husseini was speaking on the sideline of a workshop held recently and discussed the strategic plan for the city of Jeddah.
The workshop was organized by the General Presidency of Meteorology and Environment Protection.
He said that areas not covered by the networks rely on septic tanks for sewage disposal, pointing out that this creates problems for residents as well as the environment.
Describing the state of sewage networks in some neighborhoods he said: “They are in a very bad shape, as construction works of some of them dates back to more than 25 years ago.” He said the lifespan of pipes is between 10 to 15 years.
“There is an urgent need to replace them, as some of them are leaking, damaging and polluting the soil in the process,” he said.
He said that part of the water treatment plants that are currently in Jeddah, 11 stations, need restructuring operations in terms of the method of work and workers, as well as the areas served by these stations.





“A number of them can be expanded to serve as much areas as possible” he said.
But other stations, he pointed out, need to be addressed and fixed immediately.
Large quantities of the treated water, said Al-Husseini are poured into the sea, “But we should work out a way to use these quantities so as not to waste the costs spent in these processes.”


Finance officials meet to map out Saudi Arabia’s budget plans

Updated 27 min 18 sec ago
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Finance officials meet to map out Saudi Arabia’s budget plans

  • Finance representatives of 150 government bodies meet for the Budget Forum 2020

RIYADH: Saudi finance chiefs have kicked off a major conference in the capital aimed at mapping out the Kingdom’s budget requirements.
Around 300 specialists representing 150 government bodies met at the InterContinental hotel in Riyadh for the Budget Forum 2020.
Minister of Finance Mohammed Al-Jadaan welcomed delegates to the second edition of the gathering organized by the Saudi Finance Ministry under the slogan “Partnership and Empowerment.”
Al-Jadaan said the ministry was focused on “partnership and commitment,” and sought to share the challenge of developing an effective budget to achieve the Kingdom’s ambitious goals.
“We are also committed to empowering financial leaderships to learn about the ministry’s programs and projects and provide training and qualification opportunities to the best international standards,” he added.
The finance chief said the budget planning process required the collaboration of multiple authorities and a clear strategy based on transparency. 
Items up for discussion at the forum included financial planning in governmental bodies, automation, and the promotion of revenues and efficient spending.
Finance Ministry steering committee chairman, Abdul Aziz bin Saleh Al-Freih, stressed the importance of the forum in getting the ball rolling at an early stage on formulating a general state budget.
Workshops were held on the sidelines of the conference focused on empowering government organizations, and a training program on financial planning and income estimations was also staged.