IILM reshuffles Shariah board

Updated 23 July 2013
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IILM reshuffles Shariah board

KUALA LUMPUR/SYDNEY: The Malaysia-based International Islamic Liquidity Management Corp. (IILM) has reshuffled its Shariah board, losing four of its original six members including senior Saudi and Qatari scholars, according to the body's website.
The IILM, backed by the central banks of nine countries as well as the Jeddah-based Islamic Development Bank, was founded in October 2010 to help develop cross-border markets in Islamic financial instruments.
But it has been troubled by internal management upheaval — it changed its chief executive late last year — and the surprise pullout in April this year of Saudi Arabia's central bank.
The changes to the Shariah board, which monitors the IILM's activities and instruments to ensure that they follow Islamic principles, could indicate further delays to the body's plan to begin issuing sukuk.
The IILM announced in April that it aimed to make an initial issue worth up to $500 million in the second quarter of this year but has not yet proceeded with the plan, and it has not given a new time frame for it.
The body did not issue a statement on the changes to its Shariah board, which were merely listed on the personnel section of its website. It did not respond to Reuters questions about the changes. According to a December 2010 press release, the Shariah board members were to serve three-year terms.


Two Saudi scholars are no longer listed as members of the IILM Shariah board, including Mohamed Ali Elgari, a prominent expert who sits on over 80 Shariah boards around the world. Elgari's office did not respond to Reuters questions.
Ahmed Ali Abdalla Hamad is the other Saudi scholar no longer listed; he serves as vice-chairman on the Shariah board of Saudi Arabia's Al Rajhi Bank, the world's largest Islamic bank by assets.
The departures also include Qatari-born Waleed Bin Hady Al Mullah, chairman of the Shariah boards of Qatar Islamic Bank and Masraf Al Rayan, two of the Gulf Arab state's largest Islamic lenders.
Of the original members of the IILM's Shariah board, formed in 2010, only two scholars from Nigeria and Malaysia remain. They have now been joined by scholars from Indonesia and Kuwait; currently the board consists of four members.
It is unclear exactly when the reshuffle occurred, but Indonesian scholar Cecep Hakim's profile on LinkedIn, an online service for business networking, shows he left the Shariah board in April this year, roughly coinciding with Saudi Arabia's exit from the IILM.
The IILM's internal Shariah coordinator, Edib Smolo from Bosnia, left the body in March this year, according to his LinkedIn profile. He declined to comment. The Shariah coordinator does not sit on the Shariah board but works with it to design and structure transactions, do research and perform other tasks.
The planned sukuk issue by the IILM would be part of a program that could eventually expand to $3 billion, and would be a major step in developing Islamic finance globally; it aims to address a shortage of liquid, investment-grade instruments which Islamic banks can trade across borders.
The IILM has not explained why it has taken so long since 2010 to develop the sukuk program. People familiar with the body have said it has encountered complex issues involving regulation in various jurisdictions and the choice of assets to back the sukuk.
Current shareholders in the IILM are the central banks and monetary agencies of Indonesia, Kuwait, Luxembourg, Malaysia, Mauritius, Nigeria, Qatar, Turkey and the United Arab Emirates, as well as the IDB, according to its website.


US-China trade deal hopes grow as oil prices decline

Updated 19 June 2019
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US-China trade deal hopes grow as oil prices decline

  • Data suggested a smaller-than-expected fall in American crude inventories
  • Preparations underway for Donald Trump to meet Xi Jinping next week at the G20 summit in Osaka

LONDON: Oil prices declined on Wednesday as data suggested a smaller-than-expected fall in American crude inventories, as hopes for a US-China trade deal continue to grow.
Brent crude futures were down 51 cents at $61.72 a barrel.
US West Texas Intermediate crude fell 25 cents to $53.65 a barrel. On Tuesday, it had recorded its biggest daily rise since early January.
After weeks of swelling, US crude stocks fell by 812,000 barrels last week to 482 million, the American Petroleum Institute said on Tuesday, a smaller fall than the 1.1-million-barrel drop analysts had expected.
Official estimates on US crude stockpiles from the US government’s Energy Information Administration are due during afternoon trading.
US President Donald Trump offered some support, saying preparations were underway for him to meet Chinese President Xi Jinping next week at the G20 summit in Osaka, Japan, amid hopes a trade deal could be thrashed out between the two powers. Trump has repeatedly threatened China with tariffs since winning office in 2016.
European Central Bank President Mario Draghi also offered a boost, saying on Tuesday that he would ease policy again if inflation failed to accelerate.
Tensions remain high in the Middle East after last week’s tanker attacks. Fears of a confrontation between Iran and the US have mounted, with Washington blaming Tehran, which has denied any role.
Trump said he was prepared to take military action to stop Iran having a nuclear bomb but left open whether he would approve the use of force to protect Gulf oil supplies.
On Wednesday, oil markets shrugged off a rocket attack on a site in southern Iraq used by foreign oil companies.
“It is interesting to note that the crude oil futures market could not rally on hawks planting bombs in the Strait of Hormuz but could rally on doves planting quantitative easing,” Petromatrix’s Olivier Jakob said in a note.
“This is an oil market that doesn’t know how to react when an oil tanker blows up but knows how to react when the head of a central bank makes some noise.”
Members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries have agreed to meet on July 1, followed by a meeting with non-OPEC allies on July 2, after weeks of wrangling over dates.
OPEC and its allies will discuss whether to extend a deal on cutting 1.2 million barrels per day of production that runs out this month.