Women’s IDs can be issued without guardians’ consent

Updated 12 August 2013
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Women’s IDs can be issued without guardians’ consent

There are several ways women can obtain their national identity card without seeking their guardians’ permission, according to Khalid Fakhri, member of the National Assembly for Human Rights.
Fakhri said the guardians’ role is to identify and facilitate statutory procedures for women provided that they are included in family records.
He said that procedures and rules are clear regarding women’s rights to obtain a national ID and apply for paperwork to be completed at any department with the exception of proceedings in civil cases.
Current regulations within the civil status system give women several options for obtaining their national IDs. This includes the presence of a guardian for identification purposes via signed family records. If this is not possible, she can submit the ID of a relative aged 18 years or older, or, if this is also not possible, two women aged 18 or older can come to the Department of Civil Status to complete statutory procedures.
These are all viable and acceptable methods for a woman to obtain her ID for civil cases without requiring the consent or presence of the guardian. Women also have the freedom to select who will facilitate obtaining the national ID.
But the presence of a guardian is intended only for identification purposes to facilitate the procedures.
The guardian does not have the right to refuse because being recognized through an ID is a fundamental right and conforms to procedures in place in many countries for security considerations and other services.


World boxing champ Amir Khan eyes Saudi Arabia for new academy

Updated 5 min 23 sec ago
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World boxing champ Amir Khan eyes Saudi Arabia for new academy

  • The former boxing world champion said there were a lot of warriors in Saudi Arabia
  • Khan said he believes the Kingdom possesses a lot of talent

RIYADH: British-Pakistani boxer Amir Khan wants to open a boxing academy in Saudi Arabia, and hopes the Kingdom will see rising stars become Olympic champions soon.

Speaking at the Misk Global Forum in Riyadh on Wednesday, he said the only way to achieve this was by opening academies in the Kingdom.  

“I believe that there is so much talent in Saudi, but there aren’t many boxing clubs,” he said.

Speaking at the midday session of the forum in a session titled “What Defines Me,” Khan said he believed there was a reason Saudis are good boxers: “Maybe it is in their blood – they are warriors.”

The former world champion and Olympic medalist, arrived on stage at the event wearing traditional Saudi clothes, both the thobe and shomakh, and was interviewed by Lubna Al-Omair, the first Saudi female Olympic fencer.

Khan has a charitable foundation in his name that is dedicated to empowering disadvantaged young people globally.

“All around the world I build boxing academies, (including in) England, Pakistan,” he said. “It is a way to give back and help the less fortunate. We travel all around the world to help the poor, the youth ... in the future they will do the same.”

Khan credited his father for placing him in a boxing club. “When I was young, I was hyperactive, always misbehaving, and my father took me to the boxing club. Boxing gave me discipline.”  

And he credited fans for his motivation, explaining: “At 17 I became a household name and couldn’t walk the streets without people stopping me for a picture. People are looking up to me and wanting me to succeed, and that was my motivation.”

Khan said boxing helps develop self-discipline and emotional intelligence. “Boxing teaches you to be disciplined,” he said.

“What boxing teaches you is not to fight outside. If a fight is taking place, I walk away.”

Khan also had advice for athletes in training: “The harder you work in the gym, the easier it will be in the game,” he said.

And he added: “Work hard and never give up. I always like to work harder than my opponents.”