India's CBI clears former AMU official of graft raps

Updated 12 August 2013
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India's CBI clears former AMU official of graft raps

India's Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) on Sunday exonerated Prof. P. K. Abdul-Azis, the former vice chancellor of Aligarh Muslim University (AMU), from a series of corruption charges that were labelled against him by his rivals.
The CBI has submitted its report on the alleged financial irregularities involving the VC as the agency couldn’t find anything incriminating against him.
Talking to Arab News over phone, Azis, currently the vice chancellor of the University of Science and Technology, Meghalaya, expressed his happiness over the CBI decision.
“Thanks to Almighty Allah, the CBI clean chit has come as a big relief,” he said and expressed thanks to the agency for “bringing out the truth.”
“I am also thankful to my well wishers for having full faith in me. I can now easily take my mission for the upliftment of education ahead.”
Azis was AMU vice chancellor from 2007 to 2012, in which period several allegations were made against him by his rivals including misconduct under the AMU Act 1920, violating the statutes directives, ordinances and regulations of the AMU Grant Commission.
Azis, it was alleged, made the AMU pay his income tax besides violating university rules by transferring Rs 80 million of Provident Fund money from the State Bank of India to Shreyas Gramin Bank.
It was also alleged that the university funds were misused for interior decoration of his residence. At least 26 charges were framed against him, out of which 17 were of administrative level, but Azis had refuted these charges.
The Union Ministry of Human Resources and Development set two panels to probe the matter, but their findings remained inconclusive. Later at the request of Kapil Sibal, the former minister of human resources and development, the CBI began the investigation.
It first registered a preliminary inquiry in July 2011 after it was alleged that he had flouted rules of the institution for his own benefits. He was grilled for alleged financial irregularities too.
Giving clean chit to Azis, the CBI had submitted the closure report at Patiala House court of CBI Judge Swarnakanta Sharma.


Pakistan PM Imran Khan fires back after criticism from Donald Trump

Updated 57 min 41 sec ago
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Pakistan PM Imran Khan fires back after criticism from Donald Trump

  • Imran Khan tweeted that Pakistan had suffered 75,000 casualties and lost $123 billion in the “US War on Terror”

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan’s prime minister fired back Monday after President Donald Trump accused the country of harboring Osama bin Laden despite getting billions of dollars in American aid.
Imran Khan tweeted that Pakistan had suffered 75,000 casualties and lost $123 billion in the “US War on Terror,” despite the fact that no Pakistanis were involved in the Sept. 11 attacks. He said the US has only provided a “minuscule” $20 billion in aid.
US commandos killed bin Laden in a May 2011 raid in Abbottabad, Pakistan, where he had been living in seclusion in a house near a well-known military academy. Pakistan denies it knew bin Laden’s whereabouts prior to the raid, which was carried out without its knowledge. It later arrested Dr. Shakil Afridi, who had run a fake vaccination campaign in Abbottabad to help the CIA confirm bin Laden’s whereabouts.
In an interview with “Fox News Sunday,” Trump said “everybody in Pakistan” knew bin Laden was there and no one said anything despite the US providing $1.3 billion a year in aid. Trump said he had cut off the aid “because they don’t do anything for us, they don’t do a damn thing for us.”
The US and Afghanistan have long accused Pakistan of turning a blind eye to Islamic extremists and of harboring leaders of the Afghan Taliban. Pakistan denies those allegations, pointing to the heavy toll of its war against the Pakistani Taliban, a separate militant group that carries out attacks inside Pakistan.
Khan said Pakistan’s tribal areas along the border have been devastated by years of war, with millions uprooted from their homes.
He also pointed to the logistical support Pakistan has provided for the US war in Afghanistan. The main overland supply route for American forces fighting in Afghanistan runs through Pakistan.
Khan said the US has made Pakistan a “scapegoat” for its failures in Afghanistan, where the Taliban are stronger than at any point since the 2001 US-led invasion.