American charged with wife’s murder

Updated 22 August 2013
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American charged with wife’s murder

The General Court in Riyadh is looking into the murder of a Sri Lankan national residing in Riyadh after a representative from the Bureau of Investigation and Prosecution charged her husband, a US national, with her murder.
A local daily reported that the accused, a Christian who converted to Islam while he was in detention, disposed of the body by stuffing it into a pipeline used for gas and petroleum exploration.  
The newspaper reported that the General Court in Riyadh began its procedures after taking statements from witnesses who used to work with the accused. The Chargé d’Affaires of the Embassy of Sri Lanka in Riyadh said the mission had hired a lawyer to plead the case of the Sri Lankan woman who was living with her husband in Saudi Arabia. He said he is confident that Saudi law will make sure justice is served.
The murder came to light when the Al-Kharj Governorate police received a call from the company where the accused used to work, saying they had found a stiff body in a seated position stuffed in a special well used for gas and petroleum exploration. Police officials arrested the American on the strength of testimonies given by his Chinese and Saudi co-workers.
The source said the accused had admitted that the victim was his wife. She was stuffed in a pipeline which had been sealed from both sides and was subsequently buried. The American said his wife had been missing for many months because of family and moral conflicts, but he didn’t notify the authorities about her absence.
The source said the American hired several Chinese and Saudi workers to seal and weld the pipeline’s openings after the body was stuffed in, six months before the body was found. The accused worked as a supervisor for gas and petrol excavations for Saudi Aramco.
The source said Chinese workers welded an iron pipeline from one side in one of the excavation sites. The other side of the pipeline connects the pipes together and is welded with iron plates. The accused ordered the Chinese worker to put a semi-circular iron piece on the cover to facilitate opening and closing.
During preliminary police investigation at the scene of crime, the accused gave several versions about his wife’s disappearance. First, he denied he ordered a Chinese worker to weld the pipe and move it next to his room. Then he said he didn’t remember telling him to do that, and later he said he never even saw the pipe and ordered workers to bury the waste and not the pipes.
“The accused tried to mislead detectives by putting clothes and personal belongings of Chinese workers inside the pipe,” the source added. 


Hajj 2018: What’s on pilgrims’ bucket lists

Masjid Quba in Madinah is a favorite destination for Hajj pilgrims, according to tour guides. Below: The Cave of Hira, Al-Baqi’ cemetery and the Prophet’s Chamber allow visitors to step back in time. (Getty Images)
Updated 15 August 2018
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Hajj 2018: What’s on pilgrims’ bucket lists

  • A number of companies in Makkah and Madinah help people organize their trips, making sure they cover the important sites in the two holy cities
  • Most of the sites in the two holy cities are spiritual, giving pilgrims a sense of the prophecies

RIYADH: Hajj is one of the biggest dreams of every Muslim’s life, and pilgrims looking forward to their stay in Makkah and Madinah say a bucket list is the best way to plan the trip. 

Most of the sites in the two holy cities are spiritual, giving pilgrims a sense of the prophecies. Standing in the places of the Holy Prophet transports them back to the past as if they lived those incredible moments. 

A number of companies in Makkah and Madinah help people organize their trips, making sure they cover the important sites in the two holy cities.

Sayed Shafei, an operation manager for City Sightseeing, a tour company in Madinah and worldwide, told Arab News: “We offer a special tour with a multilingual tour guide presented in eight languages. We also offer 24-hour tickets. We have scheduled tourism trips starting from the Prophet’s Mosque to 12 destinations every 30 minutes. The whole trip lasts for 14 hours a day.” 

Asked about the most popular requests, Shafei said: “Our customers always ask to visit Masjid Quba, the Sayed Al-Shuhada Mosque in Uhud, which is considered a vital historic landmark of Madinah, and Al-Qiblatain Mosque.” 

Most of the group’s customers are from East Asia, but many also visit from Kuwait, Bahrain, the UAE, Indonesia, Malaysia, the US and Europe.

Munirah Al-Jebreen, an English instructor at Princess Noura University who will perform Hajj this year, told Arab News her bucket list began with an online search. 

“I found a travel guide on Google that has all the best sites in Madinah and Makkah, so I decided to visit Uthman ibn Affan’s Farm and Well in Madinah, the Holy Qur’an exhibition, and one of the most important places I want to visit is the grave of the Holy Prophet,” she said.

The area between the Prophet’s Chamber, which holds his grave, and the Mimbar is known as the Rawdah, which is actually the Garden of Paradise. It is presently distinguished by a green carpet.

Al-Jebreen also listed some of her planned tour destinations in Makkah, including the Cave of Hira, where the Holy Prophet meditated frequently during the first 40 years of his life and the site of the first revelation. 

She will also visit Bilal Mosque and Mount Abu Qubais and, finally, will try Al-Garmushi, one of the famous traditional restaurants in Makkah.