HSBC and NCB Capital announce completion of SR15bn GACA sukuk

Updated 07 October 2013
0

HSBC and NCB Capital announce completion of SR15bn GACA sukuk

HSBC and NCB Capital announced the completion of the largest ever government guaranteed sukuk in Saudi Arabia for the General Authority of Civil Aviation (GACA). Totaling SR15.211 billion ($4.056 billion), the sukuk achieved a profit rate of 3.21 percent p.a. (per annum).
HSBC and NCB Capital acted as joint lead managers and bookrunners of the sukuk. Additionally, HSBC acted as the sukuk coordinator, sole Shariah coordinator, and agent of sukuk holders and payment administration. Standard Chartered Saudi Arabia was co-lead manager for the issuance.
Walid Khoury, CEO of HSBC Saudi Arabia Ltd., said: “This is the second great achievement for GACA, and stands as a testament of the confidence local investors have in this high quality name. Not only did it raise SR15.211 billion for the authority, but it’s done so at an attractive profit rate of 3.21 percent p.a. with a diverse set of investors participating.”
Jawdat Al-Halabi, CEO of NCB Capital, said: “We are honored to have jointly led this strategic transaction in support of the government’s plans to expand the Kingdom’s infrastructure. The sukuk market, both globally and in the Kingdom has been gaining momentum in recent years and we see this trend continuing and reflected in the huge demand by investors for this issue.”
This deal was 1.9 times oversubscribed with strong demand from a wide range of investors, including banks, sovereign funds, pension agencies, insurance companies and corporates. This diversity of investors means that any subsequent issuance won’t be over reliant on any one sector and GACA could tap into a ready investor base. This sheer scale of the demand and the eventual pricing demonstrates the confidence buyers have in both the region and its government.
Fahad Alsaif, head of capital markets and corporate finance, HSBC Saudi Arabia, said: “Many sukuk of this size are issued in multiple tranches, with different prices and dates of maturity. However, this sukuk has been launched as one single issuance, and in doing so has become the largest single-tranche sukuk ever issued in Saudi Arabia.”
Hicham Hatoum, head of investment banking at NCB Capital, says: “The fact that the largest ever Saudi riyal issue attracted a demand of this magnitude is a testament to the lead managers’ joint drive to diversify the targeted investor base. We were pleased to attract insurance companies and corporate sector treasuries alongside traditional government and bank investors.”
Boutros Klink, CEO of Standard Chartered Capital, said: “The Saudi debt capital markets are fast growing and an issuance of this scale demonstrates the depth of the market. We look forward to becoming an active participant in developing the Kingdom’s debt capital markets and are thankful to the authority for giving the opportunity to contribute to the success of this transaction.”


Additionally, this issuance is also approved by the Saudi Arabian Monetary Agency (SAMA) to be eligible for repo arrangements and has also been assigned zero percent risk weighting for capital adequacy calculation purpose. This means that investors can hold this sukuk as an investment, but also use it as an effective liquidity tool by using it to guarantee cash from the central bank.


Wealthy Gulf individuals feel more confident about regional prospects

Updated 25 April 2018
0

Wealthy Gulf individuals feel more confident about regional prospects

  • “Factors like the region’s stability, attractive investment opportunities and low-tax environment are seen as the main drivers behind the growing confidence in the region’s economy.”
  • Among the most optimistic were respondents in the UAE, with 57 percent of those surveyed saying they thought the overall outlook was improving.

DUBAI: Survey finds growing optimism on region’s economies, but Saudi investors remain wary.

Wealthy individuals in the Gulf are more optimistic over the future of the region and the global economy compared with last year, and are increasing likely to invest in their own countries and other emerging markets in Asia than in western economies. These are among the main findings of an annual survey by Dubai-based Emirates Investment Bank (EIB), released on Tuesday, of the sentiment among high net worth individuals (HNWIs) in the region. 

After two years of falling confidence, some 60 percent of regional HNWIs now believe things will improve or stay the same. Fewer are pessimistic about both regional and global economic prospects than last year, while nearly 80 percent of respondents said they would prefer to invest in Gulf assets, rather than looking abroad.

The recovering oil price was a big reason for the increasing feel-good factor in the Gulf, according to Khalid Sifri, EIB’s chief executive officer, who added: “Factors like the region’s stability, attractive investment opportunities and low-tax environment are seen as the main drivers behind the growing confidence in the region’s economy.”

After falling below $30 per barrel in early 2016, oil has subsequently recovered to a three-and-a-half-year high, breaching the $75 a barrel mark yesterday for the first time since November 2014.

However, the overall optimism of the survey masks some concerns among regional HNWIs; in Saudi Arabia, 48 percent of respondents said that they saw the regional economic situation improving or staying the same, against 52 percent who felt it was likely to worsen in 2018.The survey was conducted last November and December, when investor sentiment in the Kingdom was affected by the high-profile anti-corruption campaign undertaken against some prominent business people accused of financial wrong-doing. “It may have been affected by that. We shall see what the situation is at the end of this year,” Sifri said. 

Respondents from Kuwait were even more pessimistic. None of the respondents from the country felt that things were going to improve on the investment front this year, while 54 percent said they would worsen. Among the most optimistic were respondents in the UAE, with 57 percent of those surveyed saying they thought the overall outlook was improving. On the long-term global outlook, a total of 78 percent of those surveyed across the region were optimistic about prospects over the next five years, with most citing positive economic and political stability as the reason, along with a smaller number who said oil price stabilization would benefit the world economy. The oil price recovery was the biggest reason for regional optimism. 

The geopolitics of the region was claimed as a big factor in deciding investment decisions, but Saudis were less concerned than others. Only 29 percent in the Kingdom said they were influenced by geo-political events, compared with 83 percent in Qatar and 85 percent in the UAE. 

Oil prices, economic reforms and the introduction of VAT were also factors influencing investment, as was the election of Donald Trump as president of the USA. There has been a big shift in global investor orientation outside the GCC. Nearly half of regional wealthy investors (47 percent) are now looking to Asia, 38 percent to the wider Middle East and North Africa, some 34 percent to Europe and only 17 percent to North America. The survey was conducted among 100 HNWIs with $2 million or more in investable assets.