Ethiopia imposes KSA travel ban

Updated 25 October 2013
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Ethiopia imposes KSA travel ban

The Ethiopian government has imposed a six-month ban on its citizens from traveling to Saudi Arabia for work.
Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn said the conditions of Ethiopians working in Saudi Arabia, particularly domestic workers, had continued to get worse.
“Effective next month, we will not send our citizens to Saudi Arabia to work for a period of (at least) six months,” he said in Ethiopian Parliament.
Abdulbaqi Ahmad Ajlan, the Saudi Ambassador to Ethiopia, said the embassy has not received official directives from the Ethiopian government to stop exporting workers to the Kingdom and that the embassy is still issuing visas and completing paperwork for those who had obtained two-year visas.
Yehia Al-Muqbel, chairman of the Recruitment Committee at the Jeddah Chamber, accused the Ethiopian government of creating obstacles to send housemaids to the Kingdom. “The Ethiopian government wants to stop exporting home maids to the ingdom through delaying their travel procedures. The Ministry of Labor, however, is still looking for new markets for recruiting housemaids.”
The recruitment suspension comes in the wake of several incidents involving Ethiopian housemaids, the most recent of which includes the stabbing of a Saudi employer by a housemaid.


Boulder-sized sunfish washes ashore in Australia

Updated 2 min 59 sec ago
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Boulder-sized sunfish washes ashore in Australia

  • The enormous creature is distinct for both its size and peculiar shape
  • The fish can weigh up to 2.5 tons (2,200 kilograms)

SYDNEY: A boulder-sized fish of a kind known to “sink yachts” has washed up on an Australian beach.
The 1.8 meter (six feet) specimen — believed to be a Mola Mola, or ocean sunfish — came ashore near the mouth of the Murray River in South Australia at the weekend.
The enormous creature is distinct for both its size and peculiar shape featuring a flattened body and fins.
The fish can weigh up to 2.5 tons (2,200 kilogrammes), according to National Geographic.
A photo circulating on social media showed two people on a beach standing over the giant specimen, which had died.
“The amount of news and media from all over the world wanting to report it has been on another level,” Linette Grzelak, who posted the image to Facebook, told AFP.
“Never expected this.”
South Australian Museum fish collection manager Ralph Foster said the fish was actually at the smaller end of the scale for the species.
It earned its name for basking in the sun near the ocean’s surface, but is also known to dive several hundred meters (feet) into the depths, he said.
“I’ve actually had a good look at it, we get three species here and this is actually the rarest one in South Australian waters,” Foster told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC).
“They can get a lot bigger... it’s probably an average-sized one, they can get nearly twice as big as that,” he added.
Mola Mola have also been known to damage vessels, Foster added.
“We get a lot of them hit by boats and some of them are so large they actually sink yachts,” he said.
“We know very little about them, it’s only in the last few years that technology has allowed us to start learning about them.
“They are amazing things, they really are.”