Kuwait Airways resumes Iraq flights

Updated 21 November 2013
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Kuwait Airways resumes Iraq flights

BAGHDAD: A scheduled Kuwait Airways flight landed in Iraq late on Wednesday for the first time since the 1990 Iraqi invasion, in the latest sign of improved ties between the neighbors.
Kuwait's national airline flew 100 passengers to Najaf, 160 km (100 miles) south of Baghdad, the director of Najaf's airport told state news agency KUNA.
KUNA said Kuwait Airways planned to fly twice a week to Najaf, which is more secure than the capital Baghdad, where bombings are an almost daily occurrence.
Diplomatic relations between Kuwait and Iraq improved last year after a settlement over debts from the era of the 1991 Gulf War, in which a US-led coalition forced Iraqi troops out of Kuwait.
Ties have also been bolstered by a series of bilateral visits involving Kuwait's ruler and Iraq's prime minister.
Iraq's state airline resumed flights between Baghdad and Kuwait in February for the first time since the invasion. But most major carriers that ply the route still do so through other cities such as Dubai, even though the Iraqi and Kuwaiti capitals lie just 560 km (346 miles) apart.
In December, Kuwait Airways dropped legal cases against Iraqi Airways in return for compensation of $500 million.
The legal row was part of a broader dispute over billions of dollars in reparations dating back to the invasion, when the forces of former Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein seized aircraft and parts.


General Electric to trial world’s largest wind turbine in Britain

Updated 40 min 12 sec ago
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General Electric to trial world’s largest wind turbine in Britain

  • Britain is aiming to be a leader in offshore wind technology
  • The largest wind turbines currently in operation are MHI Vestas’ 9 MW turbines in Aberdeen, Scotland

LONDON: US conglomerate General Electric will test the world’s largest wind turbine in a facility in northeast England, it said on Tuesday.
GE Renewable Energy, the renewable arm of the US firm, and the British government-funded Offshore Renewable Energy Catapult signed a five-year agreement to test GE’s Haliade-X 12 megawatt (MW) turbine in Blyth, Northumberland.
“This is an important agreement because it will enable us to prove Haliade-X in a faster way by putting it under controlled and extreme conditions,” John Lavelle, president & CEO of GE’s Offshore Wind business said in a statement.
Britain is aiming to be a leader in offshore wind technology and its capacity could grow by five times current levels to 30 gigawatts by 2030, according to a report funded by a range of industry participants.
Britain’s energy and clean growth minister Claire Perry welcomed the agreement and said it highlights Britain’s world class research and testing facilities.
The largest wind turbines currently in operation are MHI Vestas’ 9 MW turbines installed at Vattenfall’s windfarm off the coast of Aberdeen, Scotland.
Companies have been building larger turbines to help get more power from each turbine installed and drive down the cost of the electricity they produce.
The agreement also includes a 6 million pound ($8.5 million) combined investment from Britain’s Innovate UK and the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) to install the world’s largest and most powerful grid emulation system at the Catapult’s Blyth center.