Expat seeks compensation for lost limb in the line of duty

Updated 07 December 2013
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Expat seeks compensation for lost limb in the line of duty

A Sri Lankan driver here has accused his sponsor of failing to compensate him for losing a limb while on duty.
Ruwan Chamara Herath, 29, said he had a serious accident while driving a vehicle without headlights. He claimed his sponsor forced him to drive the vehicle at midnight even though he allegedly knew that the headlights were not working.
Herath claimed that the company he works for treats its workers “like slaves without proper regard for local labor regulations.” He said he had to do 20 trips a day transporting sand in huge trucks for a cement factory, along with 16 other Sri Lankan drivers.
“Our sponsor has not given us iqamas or driver’s licenses for the last nine months.”
Herath said the drivers were afraid to go outside because they feared the authorities would arrest them. He also claimed that most of the company’s trucks are not properly insured which makes it impossible for him to get compensation.
“I need proper compensation from my sponsor and I want an artificial leg so that I can continue my life.” He claimed that his sponsor has refused to pay him last month’s salary because he apparently had to repair the truck involved in the accident.
Herath said his sponsor wants him to go home without any compensation. “How can I go home without a leg? How am I going to help my wife? I’m the breadwinner of the family,” he said. He also has a two-year-old baby.
He said he came to the Kingdom to make money to build his dream house on a plot of land he owns in Gampaha, a suburb some 30 kilometers from Colombo, the Sri Lankan capital.
He said an artificial leg would cost SR8,000 in Sri Lanka. He would be happy if someone could help him purchase it. He has asked the Sri Lankan consulate in Jeddah for help.


Saudi women incubate creative ideas for community development

Updated 18 August 2018
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Saudi women incubate creative ideas for community development

JEDDAH: The Halcyon Incubator fellowship on Friday concluded a program in Washington, DC for a group of Saudi female pioneers in social development.
Fourteen Saudi innovators working in community development on Thursday gave presentations on seven ambitious projects that highlight applications that they are seeking to implement.
The seven Saudi projects highlighted a number of unique applications, such as the online on-click link between dentists, lab technicians and labs, whose design has shown that it will make a major social change in its country and will save waiting for medical appointments and reports.
Another online project helps children with autism to improve communication skills through games and educational activities.
Another focuses on linking history and modern technology in many languages to improve tourism and make it easier for pilgrims to visit the country.
It also presented practical projects such as “Green Desert,” which seeks to contribute to solving the problem of lack of waste recycling culture in Saudi Arabia.
During his visit to the Halcyon Incubator, the director of innovation and entrepreneurship at Taibah University, Dr. Mohammed Al-Ghamdi, praised its development of social projects. He also congratulated the group of Saudi women for their innovative excellence.
The Saudi Innovations Group has spent two weeks working in the hospitality of the Halcyon Incubator, which has been named the “Kingfisher” as a symbol.
The organization seeks to promote creativity in all its forms throughout the world by stimulating and supporting creators who seek to promote the good in their communities.
The annual program of the Halcyon Incubator sponsors various groups of change-makers in the fields of arts and social projects and provides them with an environment that incubates their bold ideas and helps them to learn, gain experience and knowledge and provide them with free trial opportunities to enhance their talents and visions and transform them into influential energies in society.