Australia regains Rugby League World Cup

Updated 07 December 2013
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Australia regains Rugby League World Cup

MANCHESTER: Australia reclaimed the Rugby League World Cup from New Zealand in devastating style on Saturday, scoring five tries to cruise to a 34-2 victory in the most one-sided final in the competition’s 59-year history.
Billy Slater and Brett Morris both crossed twice and Cooper Cronk added the other try as the Kangaroos produced a near-flawless performance at Old Trafford to win the trophy for the 10th time in 14 editions.
New Zealand forward Sonny Bill Williams was bidding to become the first player to win World Cups in both rugby codes but his subdued performance was summed up when his pass was intercepted in the lead-up to Australia’s final try, a length-of-the-field score finished off by Morris.
The Australians finished without having conceded a try since their opening-day win over England five weeks ago. In their five matches since then, they shipped only four points in five matches, scoring 244.
For Australia’s 30-year-olds Greg Inglis, Cameron Smith and Johnathan Thurston, who kicked all seven of his goals, it completes the resumes of three of the modern-day rugby league greats. And it goes a long way to making up for the 2008 final, when New Zealand stunned its fierce rival in Brisbane to claim the sport’s biggest prize for the first time.
This was the heaviest victory in a final, eclipsing Australia’s 40-12 victory over the Kiwis in the same stadium in 2000.
Australia hadn’t been beaten in three years heading into the match but, crucially, New Zealand had defeated its great rival in three of the last four major finals they had met — in that 2008 World Cup and in the Four Nations in ‘05 and ‘10.
It quickly became apparent, though, that there would not be another upset here in a match played in front of 74,468 — a record crowd for an international.
Australia was sharper around the play-the-ball, made big yardage through the forward and made the most of New Zealand winger Roger Tuisava-Sheck’s injury withdrawal in only the seventh minute to make a raft of incisive attacks down its left channel. Two of their tries came down that flank.
A halftime scoreline of 16-2 didn’t flatter the Kangaroos — and their opponents walked off hands on hips, a punishing first 40 adding to the weariness after that epic semifinal victory over England last weekend.
Thurston and Shaun Johnson kicked goals in the opening 16 minutes before Australia’s attack started making serious inroads and Thurston’s perfectly judged kick was collected by the leaping Slater — soaring way above Kieran Foran — for the opening try in the 19th.
Slater was passed fit only on Thursday after making a quicker-than-expected recovery from a knee injury and his try double — and Australia’s victory — will be particularly sweet for the fullback, whose error gifted Benji Marshall a crucial try in the 2008 final.
Isaac Luke somehow held up Cronk over the line to deny the standoff a try in the 25th, but Cronk had the last laugh five minutes later when he collected Darius Boyd’s kick forward following another raid down the left to force himself over the line. Luke’s slip, just as Cronk gathered the ball, proved decisive.
Thurston converted again — in the process surpassing countryman Mick Cronin to become the record international point-scorer — and his penalty in the 36th gave the Australians a 14-point lead at the break.
New Zealand really needed to score next to make a game of it but it took less than a minute after the break for Slater to virtually clinch the trophy.
Again the Kiwis were exposed on their right, as Thurston set free Darius Boyd, who passed inside for Slater to race over.
Morris was next to cross after finishing a great move by diving to ground Jarryd Hayne’s kick forward before crashing into the advertising hoardings behind the short in-goal area.
The same duo combined for the crowning try in the 72nd, Hayne intercepting Williams’ hopeful miss-pass and sprinting 60 meters before offloading to Morris, who did the rest.


‘Being able to play football is not enough’ — Chiellini urges players to study

Updated 17 October 2018
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‘Being able to play football is not enough’ — Chiellini urges players to study

  • Giorgio Chiellini: Studying helped me relieve some of the pressure in the world of football, and kept my brain sharp
  • Chiellini: As a footballer, you need to start thinking about life after football at the beginning of your career, not at the end

MILAN: Italy and Juventus defender Giorgio Chiellini urged players to think more about their careers after football on Wednesday as he helped launch an education campaign led by global players’ union FIFPro.
Chiellini, 34, studied for a degree in economics and a Masters in business administration at Turin University at the same time as winning seven straight Serie A titles with Juventus from 2012.
“Studying helped me relieve some of the pressure in the world of football, and kept my brain sharp,” said the Juventus captain.
But only 13 percent of footballers have a higher education compared to 53 percent of men in Europe, says FIFPro.
“As a footballer, at 20 years old you feel indestructible and able to do anything in football,” said Chiellini.
“But at 35 your career is more or less finished. You then have the rest of your life in front of you, and just being able to play football is not enough.
“Only a few players manage to find a job in football. There’s also the risk of depression, and there are many former players with financial problems because they have not thought about what they are going to do, they have not opened their minds by studying.”
The towering defender from Pisa started his career at Tuscany club Livorno before joining Roma, with a season spent on loan at Fiorentina before signing for Juventus in 2005.
“As a footballer, you need to start thinking about life after football at the beginning of your career, not at the end,” added Chiellini who has also played 99 times for Italy.
“If you are not sharp in matches you can’t make the quick decisions that you need to reach the top level in football.”
As part of the ‘Mind the Gap’ campaign, player development managers (PDMs) will be appointed at several national player associations to help footballers prepare for life after retirement.
“The statistics show each year professional footballers are not as prepared as other workers to enter the employment market outside football,” FIFPro secretary general Theo van Seggelen said.
“With this campaign, we are encouraging players and player associations to work together to correct this.”