Briton’s remark sparks outrage in Singapore

Updated 23 January 2014
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Briton’s remark sparks outrage in Singapore

SINGAPORE: A Porsche-driving British wealth manager in Singapore who referred to public transport commuters as “poor people” has apologized after his Facebook posts sparked an online furore.
Anton Casey, a 39-year-old who is married to a former Singapore beauty queen, had also referred to washing “the stench of public transport off me” in one of his posts on the social network. Furious Internet users lashed out at Casey, a Singapore permanent resident, with many subjecting him and his family to verbal abuse.Singapore has one of the world’s highest per capita incomes, with official data showing it stood at Sg$65,048 ($50,890) in 2012. The city-state also boasts one of Asia’s most modern public transport systems, with its 150-km metro network carrying about two million people daily.
“I would like to extend a sincere apology to the people of Singapore... for my poor judgement,” Casey said in a statement late Tuesday.
“I have the highest respect and regard for Singapore and the good people of Singapore; this is my home,” he said.
One of Casey’s posts showed a picture of a boy, apparently his five-year-old son, sitting inside a metro train with a caption above the photo saying: “Daddy, where is your car & who are all these poor people?”
Another showed a waving boy sitting inside a silver convertible Porsche, with a caption saying: “Ahhhhhhhh reunited with my baby. Normal service can resume, once I have washed the stench of public transport off me.”
As the Facebook posts went viral online, a YouTube video of Casey emerged on various websites in which he appeared to be taunting his critics.
But Casey in his statement denied that the video was made in response to the online furore, saying it was an old video that had been “misused” by “unknown sources.”
Casey also said his Facebook page had been “breached” and his family had “suffered extreme emotional and verbal abuse online.”


Scientific study finds asylum seekers boosting European economies

Updated 19 min 41 sec ago
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Scientific study finds asylum seekers boosting European economies

  • Asylum seekers contributed most to a country’s gross domestic product after three to seven years, the research found
  • The findings come amid a rise of anti-immigrant sentiment across Europe, where immigration peaked in 2015 with the arrival of more than a million refugees and migrants from the Middle East and Africa

NEW YORK: Asylum seekers moving to Europe have raised their adopted nations’ economic output, lowered unemployment and not placed a burden on public finances, scientists said on Wednesday.
An analysis of economic and migration data for the last three decades found asylum seekers added to gross domestic products and boosted net tax revenues by as much as 1 percent, said a study published in Science Advances by French economists.
The findings come amid a rise of anti-immigrant sentiment across Europe, where immigration peaked in 2015 with the arrival of more than a million refugees and migrants from the Middle East and Africa.
An annual report by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees released on Tuesday showed the global number of refugees grew by a record 2.9 million in 2017 to 25.4 million.
The research from 1985 to 2015 looked at asylum seekers — migrants who demonstrate a fear of persecution in their homeland in order to be resettled in a new country.
“The cliché that international migration is associated with economic ‘burden’ can be dispelled,” wrote the scientists from the French National Center for Scientific Research, the University of Clermont-Auvergne and Paris-Nanterre University.
The research analyzed data from Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Norway, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom.
Asylum seekers contributed most to a country’s gross domestic product after three to seven years, the research found. They marginally lowered unemployment rates and had a near-zero impact of public finances, it said.
Greece, where the bulk of migrants fleeing civil war in Syria have entered Europe, was not included because fiscal data before 1990 was unavailable, it said.
Chad Sparber, an associate professor of economics at the US-based Colgate University, said the study was a reminder there is no convincing economic case against humanitarian migration.
But he warned against dismissing the views of residents who might personally feel a negative consequence of immigration.
“There are people who do lose or suffer,” he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.
“Immigration on balance is good,” he said. “But I still recognize that it’s not true for every person.”