‘Pyaare Afzal’ takes Pakistan by storm

Updated 29 January 2014
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‘Pyaare Afzal’ takes Pakistan by storm

KARACHI: New Pakistani television serial “Pyaare Afzal” is making huge waves these days across the country.
Hamza Ali Abbasi, the protagonist, is a “seedha saadha larka” (a straight forward lad) and is not the regular Pakistani drama mamas boy but a rather different character altogether.
“Pyaray Afzal”, which made up to the top drama ranking recently, offers a love story that takes us all away from the morbidly dark and depressing dramas that surround us.
Later, Afzal and his lover Farah fall head over heels in romance and enjoy their petty little quarrels to the core.
However, like every story has a villain, the Amreshpuri of this love story is Farah’s mother who is not too keen on marrying off her daughter with this “good for nothing lad”.
She offers him money instead but it seems like Afzal has quit gambling and has his heart set on Farah.
The drama raises various complex family issues which the Pakistani society often come across.
Abbasi said, “He is doing quite well with acting all dreamy one moment and snapping out of it the other.”
Drama guru’s say Abbasi may become the second Fawwad Afzal Khan, renowned Pakistani television star, with the women swooning after him and the Bollywood offers piling up!


’Blurred Lines’ legal saga ends in $5mn ruling favoring Marvin Gaye family

Updated 14 December 2018
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’Blurred Lines’ legal saga ends in $5mn ruling favoring Marvin Gaye family

  • “The verdict handicaps any creator out there who is making something that might be inspired by something else,” Pharell Williams said
  • The initial award in the case had triggered an angry response from many songwriters, who argued that there were major differences between the two songs at the center of the legal battle

LOS ANGELES: A long-running copyright dispute over the smash hit “Blurred Lines” has ended with the family of Motown legend Marvin Gaye winning a nearly $5 million judgment against Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams.
Thicke and Williams had been accused by Gaye’s estate of copyright infringement for their 2013 hit because of similarities with the late singer’s “Got to Give It Up.”
In 2015, the estate was awarded more than $7 million but the amount was later reduced to $5.3 million
Thicke and Pharrell appealed that judgment and a California judge earlier this year overall upheld the jury’s decision.
In a December 6 final ruling in the case made public on Thursday, US District Judge John Kronstadt ordered Thicke, Williams and Williams’ publishing company to pay Gaye’s estate $2.9 million in damages, US media reported.
Thicke was ordered to pay an additional $1.76 million. Williams and his publishing company must also separately pay Gay’s estate nearly $360,000.
Gaye’s family was also rewarded 50 percent of the song’s royalties.
The verdict caps a long-drawn legal battle that was closely watched by the music industry.
The initial award in the case had triggered an angry response from many songwriters, who argued that there were major differences between the two songs at the center of the legal battle, including the melodies and lyrics.
Williams, a popular songwriter who had another smash hit with “Happy,” said in an interview in 2015 that all creative people had inspirations.
“The verdict handicaps any creator out there who is making something that might be inspired by something else,” he said at the time.
“If we lose our freedom to be inspired, we’re going to look up one day and the entertainment industry as we know it will be frozen in litigation.”
Representatives of both Williams and Thicke could not be immediately reached for comment.