Kerala CM leads Muslims to pay homage to scholar

Updated 03 February 2014
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Kerala CM leads Muslims to pay homage to scholar

Thousands of people gathered in the northern Kerala village of Ettikulam to pay last respects to prominent religious scholar Sayed Abdurrahman Al-Bukhari, who died Saturday aged 95.
Known as Taj-ul Ulama and affectionately called Ullal Thangal, he breathed his last at his son’s residence in the village near Payyanur in Kannur district around 3.40 pm. His body was buried at the Ettikulam Jama Masjid.
His elder son Fazal Koyamma Thangal led the first funeral prayer at 7 a.m.
He leaves his wife Fatma, younger son Hamid and daughters Muthu Beevi, Beekunhi Beevi, Kunhatta Beevi, Cheriya Beevi and Ramla Beevi.
“He had contributed immensely in the fields of religious education and social life of Kerala. He was a great scholar,” Chief Minister Oommen Chandy said in his condolence message.
Thangal, a native of Chaliyam in Kozhikode district, was the President of Samastha Kerala Sunni Jam’iyyathul Ulama, an organization of scholars and clerics and the principal of Ullal Syed Madani College.
He was awarded the title of ‘Tajul Ulema’ in the year 2000 on completion of 50 years at Ullal.
He was also the president of Jamia Sa’adiya Arabic College and and advisor to the Markaz Saqafathi Ssunniya and All India Sunni Jam-iyyathul Ulema and served as a Qazi in a number of places in Karnataka and Kerala.
He assumed charge as the principal of Seyyid Madani Arabic College, Ullal, in the year 1971 and became the Qazi of Ullal on Nov. 9, 1978. He was indisposed for quite some time.
“He enjoyed tremendous goodwill among his students. He possessed a prcious wealth of thousands of disciples spread across India and abroad,” said his longtime associate AP Aboobacker Musliar.
The Sunni Education Board has declared holiday for the religious schools under it in respect of the departed soul.
Several scholars and leaders, including Aboobacker Musliar and Syed Ibrahim
Khaleel Al-Bukahri, chairman of the Ma’din group of institutions, participated in the funeral prayers.
KC Venugopal, India’s junior minister for civil aviation, and KC Joseph, Kerala’s minister for diaspora, also visited the mourning family and offered condolences.


Rohingya Muslim group fleeing India to Bangladesh stuck on ‘zero line’

Updated 1 min 33 sec ago
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Rohingya Muslim group fleeing India to Bangladesh stuck on ‘zero line’

  • The stranded Rohingya, including women and children, had been living in the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir
  • Many hundreds of thousands of members of mostly Buddhist Myanmar’s Rohingya community have left their homes in Myanmar’s Rakhine Sate

DHAKA: Bangladesh has denied entry to 31 Rohingya Muslims trying to enter from India and they are stuck in no-man’s land on the border, Bangladesh authorities said on Monday, as India cracks down on members of the community.
The stranded Rohingya, including women and children, had been living in the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir, according to a Border Guards Bangladesh (BGB) official who said he had seen some of their identity cards issued by the UN refugee agency in India.
The 31 had been stuck on Bangladesh’s border with northeast India since Friday, said the BGB commander in the area, Golam Kabir.
“We stopped them as they were crossing the border,” Kabir told Reuters by telephone.
“They’ve been on the zero line since the 18th of this month,” he said, referring to the border.
Two rounds of talks on what to do with the 31, with India’s Border Security Force on Sunday, had “ended without any conclusive decision,” Kabir said.
Many hundreds of thousands of members of mostly Buddhist Myanmar’s Rohingya community have left their homes in Myanmar’s Rakhine Sate over the decades, most fleeing military crackdowns and discrimination.
Many have sought shelter in Bangladesh — where nearly 1 million live — but others have ended up in India, Southeast Asia and beyond.
An Indian border force officer in Tripura state told reporters on Sunday that they were providing food and clothing to the Rohingya, 16 of whom were children.
The force could not be reached for comment on Monday.
India estimates that 40,000 Rohingya are living in scattered settlements in various parts of the country.
But its Hindu nationalist government regards them as illegal aliens and a security threat, and has ordered that they be identified and repatriated.
The UN refugee agency, UNHCR, has issued about 16,500 Rohingya in India with identity cards that it says can help “prevent harassment, arbitrary arrests, detention and deportation.” India does not recognize the cards.
Hundreds of Rohingya families have left India for Bangladesh since seven Rohingya men were deported to Myanmar in October. This month, India sent a Rohingya family of five to Myanmar.
The United Nations says conditions are not conducive for Rohingya to return to Myanmar.
In August, the United Nations accused the Myanmar military of mass killings and rapes of Rohingya with “genocidal intent” in a 2017 military operation that drove more than 700,000 of them into Bangladesh, according to UN agencies.
Myanmar has denied the accusations, saying its military launched a counter-insurgency operation after attacks on security posts by Muslim terrorists.