70% of Saudis are obese, says study

Updated 16 March 2014
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70% of Saudis are obese, says study

Obesity is fast turning out to be a major cause of concern for the Kingdom with seven out of 10 Saudis suffering from obesity, and 37 percent of Saudi women facing problems related to overweight. And to top it all, their problems are compounded because health insurance does not cover obesity surgery.
A recent study revealed that a whopping SR500 million per year was spent by people suffering from obesity in the Kingdom on treatment, especially diabetes which is prevalent among a large section of Saudis, including women. The disease had spread at an alarming rate of 30 percent in the past 10 years.
These startling figures were revealed at an international obesity conference in Alkhobar.
More than 450 participants from various health sectors are participating in the 3rd International Obesity Conference, with 12 speakers from Europe and America, five lecturers from the Gulf and 18 speakers from the Kingdom.
Dr. Ayed Al-Qahtani, consultant obesity surgeon, said the Ministry of Health was currently developing a national strategy to combat obesity, and was in the process of setting up a national center for obesity surgery at the King Fahd Medical City, with five similar centers across the Kingdom in the pipeline.
He also raised the issue of obesity surgery not being covered under health insurance while it is classified as a disease, and is covered under insurance all over the world.
The first day of the conference focused on the importance of having an exclusive section in all hospitals to deal with professional ethics related to obesity surgery, and to ensure that the patient understands his rights and the results of the surgery.
The conference recommended training of doctors since obesity is an independent area differing from general surgery.
Dr. Ahmad Al-Arfaj, regional executive director of Health Affairs in the Ministry of National Guard, said the conference also reviewed the latest methods for prevention and treatment of complications arising out of obesity surgery.
Dr. Abdul Majeed Al-Abdulkarim, vice president, postgraduate studies and academic affairs at King Saud University for Health Sciences, said obesity is one of the most widespread contemporary diseases in most societies.
Quoting from World Health Organization (WHO) statistics, he said there are about 1.6 billion adults world-wide who are obese. Nearly 60 percent of the population aged over 16 in the Kingdom was overweight, placing the country in the 29th position among 194 countries, he said.
Dima, a firm which handles events management, is launching a three-day exhibition-cum-forum titled “Your health is your responsibility” from April 26 in coordination with the King Khaled University and the Saudi Commission for Health Specialties. Its focus would be on obesity and related issues.


US denies ‘final conclusion’ reached on Khashoggi case

Updated 25 min 57 sec ago
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US denies ‘final conclusion’ reached on Khashoggi case

  • A US newspaper published what it claimed were details of an intelligence report on the case
  • ‘The State Department will continue to seek all relevant facts’

JEDDAH: The US government denied on Saturday it had reached a final conclusion over the killing of Jamal Khashoggi after a US newspaper published what it claimed were details of an intelligence report on the case. 
“Recent reports indicating that the US government has made a final conclusion are inaccurate,” State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said.
“There remain numerous unanswered questions with respect to the murder of Mr. Khashoggi. The State Department will continue to seek all relevant facts,” she said.
“In the meantime, we will continue to consult Congress, and work with other nations to hold accountable those involved in the killing of Jamal Khashoggi.”
The Washington Post published an article citing anonymous sources, who it says are close to the CIA which suggests the Crown Prince Mohammad bin Salman ordered the killing — something Saudi Arabia vehemently denies.
The Kingdom’s public prosecutor on Thursday released details of its investigation, saying the decision to kill the journalist was made by the head of a rogue mission during an attempt to repatriate him. The prosecutor is seeking the death penalty for five of the suspects. 
On Saturday, Donald Trump spoke with CIA Director Gina Haspel and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo from Air Force One, press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said. 
Trump praised US relations with Saudi Arabia when he was asked about the case. Saudi Arabia is “a truly spectacular ally in terms of jobs and economic development,” the US president said.
Earlier, Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to the US Prince Khalid bin Salman, strongly denied the Washington Post story, and said he did not tell Khashoggi to go to Turkey, as the report claimed. 
“I never talked to him by phone and certainly never suggested he go to Turkey for any reason. I ask the US government to release any information regarding this claim,” Prince Khalid said
Khashoggi, a Saudi who lived in the United States, was a columnist for the Post.
He was killed on Oct. 2 at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul after he went to get marriage documents.