Ras Al-Khair’s power plant to generate more jobs

Updated 19 February 2014
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Ras Al-Khair’s power plant to generate more jobs

Ras Al-Khair’s desalination and power plant project is considered as the largest plant for desalination of saline water in the world. Its first power plant with the capacity of generating more than 400 MW has started operating.
The plant was connected to the National Electric Power Company (NEPCO) in coordination with the National Grid Company as the first step of operating the complete system of power plant units.
Saline Water Conversion Corporation (SWCC) Gov. Abdul Rahman bin Muhammad Al-Ibrahim said the gas turbines would be running for the rest of the groups respectively according to the planned program.
The corporation intends to generate more than 800 MW during the second quarter of 2014, which will enhance the national grid to meet the demand for electric power in which the corporation is a key partner in providing it for industrial consumers and others.
Al-Ibrahim pointed out that the percentage of completing the project of Ras Al-Khair plant exceeds 80 percent, and it is expected to start producing water before the end of the first quarter of 2014.
Al-Ibrahim added that the cost of Ras Al-Khair desalination and power plant project and the transmission lines from the plant has reached SR23 billion.
The total length of the transmission lines from Ras Al-Khair plant to Riyadh and Hafr Al-Batin region is 1,290 km (double lines) with production capacity of 1,025 million cubic meters of desalinated water per day and electricity production capacity of 2,400 MW.
In addition, Al-Ibrahim stressed that Ras Al-Khair plant is the first plant established by the SWCC using compound production technology with efficient fuel consumption.
Al-Ibrahim said: "Ras Al-Khair plant project would provide 15,000 job opportunities while constructing the plant and its transmission lines to Riyadh and Hafr Al-Batin."
He said: "It will provide 3,500 job offers after establishing the plant, including 1,500 jobs in desalination department and 2,000 job offers with the contractors. These job offers represent the largest career opportunities in a project of this size."
He added: "The project will provide 14 great investment opportunities for national companies and it would contribute in supporting the national economy and provide more job opportunities for the youth in the Kingdom."


Libya’s National Oil against paying ‘ransom’ to reopen El Sharara field

Updated 14 December 2018
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Libya’s National Oil against paying ‘ransom’ to reopen El Sharara field

  • Ransom payment would set dangerous precedent
  • NOC declared force majeure on exports on Monday

BENGHAZI: Libya’s state-owned National Oil Corp. (NOC) said it was against paying a ransom to an armed group that has halted crude production at the country’s largest oilfield.
“Any attempt to pay a ransom to the armed militia which shut down El Sharara (oilfield) would set a dangerous precedent that would threaten the recovery of the Libyan economy,” NOC Chairman Mustafa Sanalla said in a statement on the company’s website.
NOC on Monday declared force majeure on exports from the 315,000-barrels-per-day oilfield after it was seized at the weekend by a local militia group.
The nearby El-Feel oilfield, which uses the same power supply as El Sharara, was still producing normally, a spokesman for NOC said, without giving an output figure. The field usually pumps around 70,000 bpd.
Since 2013 Libya has faced a wave of blockages of oilfields and export terminals by armed groups and civilians trying to press the country’s weak state into concessions.
Officials have tended to end such action by paying off protesters who demand to be added to the public payroll.
At El Sharara, in southern Libya, a mix of state-paid guards, civilians and tribesmen have occupied the field, camping there since Saturday, protesters and oil workers said. The protesters work in shifts, with some going home at night.
NOC has evacuated some staff by plane, engineers at the oilfield said. A number of sub-stations away from the main field have been vacated and equipment removed.
The occupiers are divided, with members of the Petroleum Facilities Guard (PFG) indicating they would end the blockade in return for a quick cash payment, oil workers say. The PFG has demanded more men be added to the public payroll.
The tribesmen have asked for long-term development funds, which might take time.
Libya is run by two competing, weak governments. Armed groups, tribesmen and normal Libyans tend to vent their anger about high inflation and a lack of infrastructure on the NOC, which they see as a cash cow booking billions of dollars in oil and gas revenues annually.