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Saudi Arabia

Saudis use nine times more electricity than fellow Arabs

Saudi individuals use on average nine times more electricity than their fellow Arab counterparts in Egypt, Algeria, Sudan and Morocco, according to a report published on Tuesday.
These countries have 185.6 million people, seven times more than Saudi Arabia. Egypt has a population of 79.39 million, Algeria 37.76 million, Sudan 36.43 million and Morocco 32.06 million. Saudi Arabia has a population of 28.4 million.
The report by the economic reporting unit of Al-Eqtisadiah newspaper stated that an individual in Saudi Arabia consumed on average 8,161 kilowatt an hour in 2011, compared to 951 kilowatt an hour by individuals in the four largest Arab countries.
A previous report by Al-Eqtisadiah stated that Saudi consumption of electricity rose by 3 percent in 2011 and 9 percent in 2012. The housing sector consumed 50 percent of the Kingdom's total electricity production.
The energy sector is subsidized by the state, with the Kingdom using an estimated 4 million barrels of oil a day to power the country.
In the Kingdom, air conditioners consume 51 percent of all electricity production. This is also because local air conditioners have a low energy efficiency ratio (EER). The EER is the ratio of the cooling capacity, in British thermal units (BTU) per hour, to the power input in watts. The higher the EER rating, the more efficient the air conditioner.
The applied standards for air conditioning units in Saudi Arabia stands at 7.5, in Kuwait at 10.8, Korea at 10.1 and Japan at 15.
The Saudi Center for Energy Efficiency was established in cooperation with a number of government entities to review standards and specifications, and study the consumption of electrical equipment in the Kingdom.
The EER of air conditioners has been raised from 7.5 to 8.5, and will be increased every year until it reaches international levels.
The energy efficiency card is a guide to consumers. It allows them to compare electrical appliances based on consumption. The card has stars showing the EER. It starts with three, which is the minimum, up to six stars. Split air conditioning units are from four to six stars.
The card has information about the year of production, the brand, type, expected annual consumption, a number to show it was tested by the Saudi Arabian Standards and Specifications Organization (SASCO), energy efficiency, cooling or heating capability, and size and weight for fridges and washing machines.
Consumers are expected to benefit from buying energy efficient products because it reduces electricity bills, cuts down on maintenance costs, and ensures spare parts are available.
The country will also reduce the amount of fuel needed for electricity and cut down on carbon gas emissions. There would be more petroleum to export, which would boost the economy, the report stated.
Saudi individuals use on average nine times more electricity than their fellow Arab counterparts in Egypt, Algeria, Sudan and Morocco, according to a report published on Tuesday.
These countries have 185.6 million people, seven times more than Saudi Arabia. Egypt has a population of 79.39 million, Algeria 37.76 million, Sudan 36.43 million and Morocco 32.06 million. Saudi Arabia has a population of 28.4 million.
The report by the economic reporting unit of Al-Eqtisadiah newspaper stated that an individual in Saudi Arabia consumed on average 8,161 kilowatt an hour in 2011, compared to 951 kilowatt an hour by individuals in the four largest Arab countries.
A previous report by Al-Eqtisadiah stated that Saudi consumption of electricity rose by 3 percent in 2011 and 9 percent in 2012. The housing sector consumed 50 percent of the Kingdom's total electricity production.
The energy sector is subsidized by the state, with the Kingdom using an estimated 4 million barrels of oil a day to power the country.
In the Kingdom, air conditioners consume 51 percent of all electricity production. This is also because local air conditioners have a low energy efficiency ratio (EER). The EER is the ratio of the cooling capacity, in British thermal units (BTU) per hour, to the power input in watts. The higher the EER rating, the more efficient the air conditioner.
The applied standards for air conditioning units in Saudi Arabia stands at 7.5, in Kuwait at 10.8, Korea at 10.1 and Japan at 15.
The Saudi Center for Energy Efficiency was established in cooperation with a number of government entities to review standards and specifications, and study the consumption of electrical equipment in the Kingdom.
The EER of air conditioners has been raised from 7.5 to 8.5, and will be increased every year until it reaches international levels.
The energy efficiency card is a guide to consumers. It allows them to compare electrical appliances based on consumption. The card has stars showing the EER. It starts with three, which is the minimum, up to six stars. Split air conditioning units are from four to six stars.
The card has information about the year of production, the brand, type, expected annual consumption, a number to show it was tested by the Saudi Arabian Standards and Specifications Organization (SASCO), energy efficiency, cooling or heating capability, and size and weight for fridges and washing machines.
Consumers are expected to benefit from buying energy efficient products because it reduces electricity bills, cuts down on maintenance costs, and ensures spare parts are available.
The country will also reduce the amount of fuel needed for electricity and cut down on carbon gas emissions. There would be more petroleum to export, which would boost the economy, the report stated.

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