Music on a mission: Japanese concert for cultural exchange

Updated 23 April 2014
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Music on a mission: Japanese concert for cultural exchange

A “Japanese Traditional Music Concert” was held at the Japanese Consul General’s residence last weekend in Jeddah. The show, organized by the Japanese Consulate in association with the Japan Foundation, was a treat for music aficionados, who felt the music took them on a journey of their beautiful country.
Matahiro Yamaguchi, Consul General of Japan in Jeddah, welcomed guests, diplomats, music lovers and journalists and introduced Japanese artists, guitarist Masahrio Nitta, drummer Shinta Wadaiko, both of the Wacocoro Brothers, and flute player Akihito Obama.
“Cultural exchange through students is an academic program today. Similarly, we hold such events for cultural exchange between two friendly countries. This is a musical night in the historic city of Jeddah,” said Yamaguchi, adding that the Japanese and Arabic music is similar in many ways because “people of Japan and the Middle East share the same five skills of music that are called ‘Mukamat of music’.”
Nitta of the Wacocoro Brothers is known as one of the “greatest shamisen players in the world.”
He said the Tsugaru Shamisen is a Japanese three-stringed folk instrument resembling a banjo. Originating in China, the Tsugaru shamisen first arrived in the southern island of Okinawa and made its way to the Tsugaru district of the Aomori prefecture in northern Japan — where over the past century it became an instrument known for its flashy, quick-fingered playing style that has stunned audiences around the world.
This was not Nitta’s first visit to the Kingdom. He visited Riyadh in 2011. He began playing the shamisen at the age of 14 and dominated national tournaments by 16.
He has performed in the US and throughout Asia.
The brothers performed live on the occasion of Portland Japanese Garden’s 50th anniversary and in honor of the Portland Art Museum’s Samurai exhibition.
Obama studied various styles of shakuhachi under leading musicians such as Toshimitsu Ishikawa (traditional shakuhachi) and Satoshi Yoneya (minyo folk music shakuhachi). Obama won the Second Annual Shakuhachi Newcomer Competition (2000).
Obama also performs as a solo musician and has participated in various ensembles. He often appears in concerts overseas and has performed in over 30 countries.
The three artists performed together 13 musical lyrics, which include: Yami Gir, Kokiruko Bushi, Tsugaru Jyongara Bushi, Yamagoe, Komuso, Komuso, Cross Road Wadaiko Solo Play, The Theme of Wacocoro Brother, The Red Sea, Shicho, Earth Beat, The Friends Bird, The Eastern Road, Shiraha, and Eco Fuji.
Yami Gir depicts two samurai fighting each other under the moon. Its music is composed by Akihito Obama. Kokiruko Bushi is the oldest folk melody in Japan, while Tsugaru Jyongara Bushi is a famous piece of music mourning those who committed suicide at the river because of their poverty in the Aomori prefecture.
Shinta Wadaiko told Arab news that during their stay in Jeddah the group enjoyed famous Saudi fast food Al-Baik and were in awe of the thobe, a garment traditionally worn by Saudi men.
“It was a great pleasure to play our music in Jeddah, which is a city of diversity, the people of Jeddah love different kinds of music, art and culture as they want to understand each other.”
The group also said they would like to come back and perform for Saudi audiences as well as perform with Saudi musicians to learn Arabic instruments such as Oud and Duff.

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Rare Ottoman dish to go on sale at Sotheby’s London

A rare piece of Iznik pottery is going on sale at Sotheby’s in London on Wednesday. (Shutterstock)
Updated 22 October 2018
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Rare Ottoman dish to go on sale at Sotheby’s London

LONDON: An exceptionally rare, museum-quality piece of Iznik pottery is to go on sale at Sotheby’s in London on Wednesday.

The Debbane Charger (circa 1480) is set to go on sale. Sotheby’s London

The Debbane Charger, or dish (circa 1480), one of the most important pieces of Iznik pottery held in private hands, represents a significant discovery in the field of Ottoman art.
Produced during the reign of Mehmet II, the piece belongs to the earliest group of Iznik, characterized by an intense, inky, blue-black coloring which reflects the embryonic stage of firing control two decades before a brighter cobalt blue was achieved.
The charger is a lost “sibling” to four other large dishes, all of which are held in museums, including the Louvre in Paris. They are described in Nurhan Atasoy and Julian Raby’s book “Iznik: The Pottery of Ottoman Turkey,” where it was suggested they were used in court banquets. Though not identical, they display a number of shared elements — the huge scale, central floret, and use of both Rumi and Hatayi motifs, the names given to the rigorously executed arabesque decoration and Chinoiserie floral scrolls respectively.
The charger was formerly in the collection of bibliophile and businessman Max Debbane, who patronized many leading cultural institutions in the town of his birth, Alexandria in Egypt, as well as serving as president of the Archaeological Society.
Opportunities to acquire works of Iznik pottery from this earliest period are very rare, with the most significant examples dating back to Sotheby’s sales in 1993 and 1997.
Further highlights of the Wednesday’s sale include Indian paintings from the estate of Joe and Helen Darrion and a costume album that presents a comprehensive catalogue of the costumes of Ottoman Turkey in the 19th century.

The sale also includes Indian artworks. Sotheby’s London