Music on a mission: Japanese concert for cultural exchange

Updated 23 April 2014
0

Music on a mission: Japanese concert for cultural exchange

A “Japanese Traditional Music Concert” was held at the Japanese Consul General’s residence last weekend in Jeddah. The show, organized by the Japanese Consulate in association with the Japan Foundation, was a treat for music aficionados, who felt the music took them on a journey of their beautiful country.
Matahiro Yamaguchi, Consul General of Japan in Jeddah, welcomed guests, diplomats, music lovers and journalists and introduced Japanese artists, guitarist Masahrio Nitta, drummer Shinta Wadaiko, both of the Wacocoro Brothers, and flute player Akihito Obama.
“Cultural exchange through students is an academic program today. Similarly, we hold such events for cultural exchange between two friendly countries. This is a musical night in the historic city of Jeddah,” said Yamaguchi, adding that the Japanese and Arabic music is similar in many ways because “people of Japan and the Middle East share the same five skills of music that are called ‘Mukamat of music’.”
Nitta of the Wacocoro Brothers is known as one of the “greatest shamisen players in the world.”
He said the Tsugaru Shamisen is a Japanese three-stringed folk instrument resembling a banjo. Originating in China, the Tsugaru shamisen first arrived in the southern island of Okinawa and made its way to the Tsugaru district of the Aomori prefecture in northern Japan — where over the past century it became an instrument known for its flashy, quick-fingered playing style that has stunned audiences around the world.
This was not Nitta’s first visit to the Kingdom. He visited Riyadh in 2011. He began playing the shamisen at the age of 14 and dominated national tournaments by 16.
He has performed in the US and throughout Asia.
The brothers performed live on the occasion of Portland Japanese Garden’s 50th anniversary and in honor of the Portland Art Museum’s Samurai exhibition.
Obama studied various styles of shakuhachi under leading musicians such as Toshimitsu Ishikawa (traditional shakuhachi) and Satoshi Yoneya (minyo folk music shakuhachi). Obama won the Second Annual Shakuhachi Newcomer Competition (2000).
Obama also performs as a solo musician and has participated in various ensembles. He often appears in concerts overseas and has performed in over 30 countries.
The three artists performed together 13 musical lyrics, which include: Yami Gir, Kokiruko Bushi, Tsugaru Jyongara Bushi, Yamagoe, Komuso, Komuso, Cross Road Wadaiko Solo Play, The Theme of Wacocoro Brother, The Red Sea, Shicho, Earth Beat, The Friends Bird, The Eastern Road, Shiraha, and Eco Fuji.
Yami Gir depicts two samurai fighting each other under the moon. Its music is composed by Akihito Obama. Kokiruko Bushi is the oldest folk melody in Japan, while Tsugaru Jyongara Bushi is a famous piece of music mourning those who committed suicide at the river because of their poverty in the Aomori prefecture.
Shinta Wadaiko told Arab news that during their stay in Jeddah the group enjoyed famous Saudi fast food Al-Baik and were in awe of the thobe, a garment traditionally worn by Saudi men.
“It was a great pleasure to play our music in Jeddah, which is a city of diversity, the people of Jeddah love different kinds of music, art and culture as they want to understand each other.”
The group also said they would like to come back and perform for Saudi audiences as well as perform with Saudi musicians to learn Arabic instruments such as Oud and Duff.

[email protected]


Winners of prestigious photography award announced at Riyadh forum

Colors of Arabia held an event to honor artists in Riyadh. (Photo/Supplied)
Updated 14 December 2018
0

Winners of prestigious photography award announced at Riyadh forum

  • Colors of Arabia forum held under the patronage of SCTH President Prince Sultan bin Salman

RIYADH; The Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) has announced the winners of the Prince Sultan Bin Salman Photography Award in four categories.
Winners of the prestigious award, which was launched to recognize budding talent and efforts to highlight the Kingdom’s heritage, received SR300,000 each and shields at a ceremony held at the Colors of Arabia forum under the patronage of Prince Sultan bin Salman, SCTH president.
The forum, which is being held at Riyadh’s International Convention and Exhibition Center, spans 15,000 square meters and is expected to have attracted 30,000 visitors by the time it ends on Sunday.
The award for the “pioneers” category, which recognizes the work of Saudis who have successfully contributed to the development of local artists, was won by a photographer in Hafr Al-Batin who began capturing day-to-day life in the Eastern Province city at only 12 years of age. The work of Jarallah Al-Hamad is now used in government brochures.
The award in the “literature and publications” category, which was open to contenders of any nationality both within and outside the Kingdom, recognizes photographers who have captured shots for publications and the film industry. Amin Al-Qusayran, a photographer and graphic designer from Madinah who began pursuing his passion 15 years ago, had previously won two awards in recognition of his work. Al-Qusayran is also author of a pictorial book shedding light on the Prophet’s Mosque in Madinah.
The “civilized heritage” category, meanwhile, was open to photographers from around the globe seeking to preserve world heritage through the power of image.
The award for this category was jointly won by two photographers of Arab descent. Mohamed Bouhsen, from Bahrain, had left university to document national heritage in his country and the Arabian Peninsula at large. He won the award alongside Jalal Al-Masri, an Egyptian photographer who has taken part in 133 local, Arab and international exhibitions.
The STCH also announced the winners of the photo and short film awards in seven categories.
Mazen Flamban, who won the award in the “cultural heritage” category, expressed his surprise and joy at having had his work recognized.
“My ambition is to revive Hijazi heritage through my lens,” Flamban told Arab News. “This was the first year I joined the competition. My photo depicts an old woman who lives alone as she reminisces over old photos.”