More funds to help cancer children

Updated 26 May 2014
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More funds to help cancer children

Princess Adela bint Abdullah signed an agreement with The Clinics Medical Center in Riyadh on behalf of SANAD Children’s Cancer Charity on Saturday for financial assistance for the care of children afflicted with terminal cancer.
Ayman S. Halawani, chief executive officer of The Clinics Medical Center, signed the agreement on behalf of his organization.
Following the signing ceremony, the princess said that the accord is an agreement for SANAD to avail itself of financial assistance from organizations in the private sector to help children suffering from terminal cancer.
“Private sector organizations have a greater role to play in helping social service organizations to facilitate the implementation of their programs,” she said, pointing out that SANAD has plans to extend its services to a larger area in the health sector to help more cancer patients.
Talking to newsmen after the signing ceremony, Halawani said the agreement would not only look after the interests of patients, but also their parents and families. “Patients will be allowed to take clinical treatment from this facility, while counseling services will be offered to the members of the patients' family.
Located on the capital's Tahlia Street, The Riyadh Clinics is the first of a chain of medical centers. “We provide a variety of medical and health services grouped under one roof in our state-of-the-art facility. We believe that the full spectrum of comprehensive medical services, the convenience and reliability we bring to our patients have been the keys to the success and excellent performance of our medical center,” he said.
The agreement, he said, is part of the company’s commitment to community services. “We hope to extend our services to other areas in the coming years,” Halawani said.
Consultant Medical Director Tariq Al-Shenafi said the Clinics hopes to extend its services to other major cities in the Kingdom and eventually to cover the Gulf region.
He said: “Our strategy is to continue developing opportunities for the expansion of medical care, medical equipment, techniques and treatments that enable facilities, the latest medical equipment and cutting edge medical techniques and treatments.
“Our concept relies on a holistic set of complementary medical services grouped under one roof; medical procedures and services across radiology, laboratory, dermatology, cosmetics, ob-gyn, general surgery, physiotherapy, wellness, nutrition, and dentistry, in addition to a wide range of medical consultations provided by our physicians across several specialties.
“Our first center also provides certain specialized services for women revolving around lifestyle, wellness, and beauty, relying on proven medical procedures.”


Virtual reality to improve patient experience in health care

Eng. Faisal Ayman Ashour helps introduce virtual reality (VR) to Saudi hospitals in 2018. (Photo/Supplied)
Updated 16 February 2019
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Virtual reality to improve patient experience in health care

  • Saudi engineer’s innovation will help people with anxiety, addictions
  • Experiments must be completed before an idea can be distributed, that sometimes takes more than 10 years,” said Ashour

JEDDAH: Virtual reality (VR) is a computer-based three-dimensional imaging sequence that creates a world within a computer system, allowing users to interact with it via a display screen, usually mounted to the face.
Previously, VR had only really impacted the public through video games, but Eng. Faisal Ayman Ashour looked at it differently.
He saw it as a potential non-pharmacologic form of pain relief, by delivering enough sensory information to reduce patient anxiety, eliminating the need for sedatives.
Many hospitals around the world have started experimenting with it. A Calgary hospital recorded 75 percent reductions in discomfort monitoring patients using it, while another at Stanford in the US had similar results when using VR to distract children from receiving previously distressing procedures.
Ashour helped introduce VR to Saudi hospitals last year.
“I always believed every human has a purpose and a mission in this life, we all have talent within us, the challenge is how we develop such a talent. Not to reinvent the wheel and share someone else’s work, but to develop it. VR was invented for entertainment mostly, but such technology can enhance the patient’s quality of life at a low cost,” he said.
The target patients are children and those in palliative care, receiving procedures as simple as a vaccination, or as painful as resetting bones and applying casts.
“I’ve developed and gained more knowledge by merging engineering with medicine. I got my fellowship in medicine to speak the same language as physicians, to develop a solid medical simulation-training program in the Kingdom. Since 2016 I’ve developed several applications involving VR and alternative reality to help patients,” Ashour added.
VR technology in medicine has also been implemented in radiotherapy, CT scans, MRIs, physiotherapy and psychology. This progress hasn’t been without problems, however.
“Introducing such a new technology or concept to be used to replace a previous technique is challenging, especially in the medical field. Experiments must be completed before an idea can be distributed, that sometimes takes more than 10 years,” said Ashour.
“The idea was to engage engineers and physicians to introduce such a modern technology to enhance patient quality of life, and maximize cost efficiency. We have developed more than 10 virtual environments for both medical training purposes, and to improve medical outcomes.”