SAGIA: Fast track service in KSA for foreign investors

Updated 08 June 2014
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SAGIA: Fast track service in KSA for foreign investors

Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority (SAGIA) has introduced a ‘fast track service’ to process applications from foreign investors within five days under a streamlined program.
The new measures have been announced in an administrative decision issued by Abdullatif Al-Othman, governor of SAGIA and chairman of the board.
This follows the Council of Ministers’ decision (No. 2 of 5/1/1421H), the Foreign Investment Law by Royal Decree (No. M/1 of 5/1/1421H) and its Implementing Regulations issued by the board’s decision No. 2/74 of 12.5.1435H.
“Overseas investors looking to launch businesses in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia will now be able to benefit from a faster and simpler application process with the launch of the new fast track service by SAGIA,” said an official from the authority.
“This new application process guarantees application decisions within five working days, once SAGIA has received all required documentation.”
The fast track is available to potential investors who meet one of the following requirements:
1 Multinational companies publicly listed in the capital market of their countries or in international stock exchanges
2. Firms manufacturing products that are classified and approved by independent agencies, and employ certified process technology
3. Small and medium size enterprises which will be operating in the area of the IPRs registered in their names, or which are classified as innovative enterprises.
4. An international company aiming to set up regional centers in Saudi Arabia.
5. A construction company classified under ‘first class’ in their countries, or which have implemented a project with a value of not less than SR500,000,000 and have a manpower of not less than 2,000 employees and total assets of not less than SR50 million.
6. A company entering into partnership with other companies qualified by Saudi government agency, or by a state-owned entity or an entity in which the government has a shareholding, or with a company listed in the Saudi Capital Market.
7. The aim of SAGIA’s fast track service is to facilitate foreign direct investment (FDI) into target sectors in the Saudi economy, namely ICT, downstream petrochemical and mining, industrial manufacturing, health care and life science, transportation and infrastructure, human capital development, and energy and petrochemicals.
Documents required to complete applications under the fast track service include:
1. Shareholders Resolution to invest in the Kingdom, listing the names of shareholders, capital share of each shareholder, company headquarters, type of activity, name of the general manager and authorized representative, duly legalized by the competent authorities and the Saudi mission.
2. Copies of enterprise Memorandum of Association and commercial registration, duly authenticated by the competent authorities and the Saudi Consulate.
3. Filling out the autobiography form and provision of a company profile, duly stamped by company’s seal.
Eligible applicants providing the necessary information should make their applications to: [email protected] in the interim, while an online application process is developed.


German economy contracts on weak foreign trade, auto bottleneck

Updated 33 min 15 sec ago
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German economy contracts on weak foreign trade, auto bottleneck

  • The third-quarter dip in GDP was the first time the economy has contracted since the first quarter of 2015
  • Investors do not expect the German economy to recover rapidly from a weak patch in the third quarter

BERLIN: The German economy contracted for the first time since 2015 in the third quarter as global trade disputes swung the traditional export growth engine of Europe’s largest economy into reverse, raising concerns that a near-decade-long expansion is faltering.
Gross domestic product (GDP) in Europe’s biggest economy contracted by 0.2 percent quarter-on-quarter, the Federal Statistics Office said on Wednesday. That compared with a Reuters forecast for a contraction of 0.1 percent.
Compared with the same quarter of the previous year, the economy grew by 1.1 percent from July to September, calendar-adjusted data showed. Analysts polled by Reuters had expected 1.3 percent.
“The slight decline in GDP compared to the previous quarter was mainly due to foreign trade developments: provisional calculations show there were fewer exports but more imports in the third quarter than in the second,” the Office said.
The third-quarter dip in GDP was the first time the economy has contracted since the first quarter of 2015.
The government had flagged a weaker third quarter last month, citing bottlenecks in the car sector stemming from the introduction of new pollution standards known as WLTP as a factor.
“Germany doesn’t have an economic problem but rather an auto sector problem. Due to the sluggish certification of cars, car production had to be noticeably reduced, with collateral damage for other sectors too,” said Andreas Scheuerle at DekaBank.
However, the ZEW research institute said on Tuesday that investors do not expect the German economy to recover rapidly from a weak patch in the third quarter.
Concerns are growing in the German economy, which is in its ninth year of expansion, about the impact of global trade disputes and Britain’s departure from the European Union.
In addition to angst about the impact of US President Donald Trump’s abrasive trade policy, German firms are concerned about instability at home where Chancellor Angela Merkel’s awkward ‘grand coalition’ has come close to collapsing twice.
Carsten Brzeski, an economist at ING, said that even though he expected the auto sector to rebound in the fourth quarter, the GDP figures for the July-September period were a “wake-up call that political stability and strong growth are by no means a given.”
“The poor export performance, despite a weak euro exchange rate, suggests that trade tensions and weaknesses in emerging markets could continue to weigh on Germany’s growth performance,” he said in a research note.
Last month, Germany’s DIHK Chambers of Industry and Commerce cut its 2018 growth forecast to 1.8 percent from 2.2 percent and predicted a slowdown to 1.7 percent next year as the economy faces mounting risks at home and abroad.