Deloitte: Family-owned businesses make up largest sector of GCC economy

Updated 30 June 2014
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Deloitte: Family-owned businesses make up largest sector of GCC economy

Around 80 percent of nonoil GDP within the Middle East region is accounted for by family-owned business groups. Typically, these privately-owned organizations span multiple business, are vertically integrated, own sizable real estate portfolios and their operational control is still maintained by the original founding family member or the second generation.
For many families in business, the rapid pace of change and growth in the marketplace presents significant concerns regarding the manner in which they will continue to safeguard and preserve their heritage and wealth.
Family-owned businesses in the Middle East face a range of challenges that affect not only the success of the business itself, but also the professional and personal goals of their owners and their stakeholders at large.
Walid S. Chiniara, an international lawyer with over 30 years’ experience across the five continents and a leading family business adviser, has joined Deloitte as the partner in charge of its Private Client Services practice (PCS) across the Middle East.
PCS is a private client-focused practice, that brings in Deloitte’s multi-disciplinary professionals to offer families in business and next generation family business entrepreneurs in the GCC and the MENA region bespoke and region-specific solutions in the area of family governance, succession planning and generational change, wealth management, tax structures and exit strategies.
“This is an exciting time for the Deloitte family and I am pleased that Walid Chiniara, one of the most experienced Family Office Advisers in the Middle East, is joining the firm to lead the Private Client Service (PCS) unit,” said Omar Fahoum, chairman and chief executive at Deloitte Middle East.
Deloitte recently conducted a survey on family-owned businesses to assess two specific areas that have an impact on their companies’ operations and growth: governance and succession.
The findings of the survey based on the input of 222 survey respondents indicate gaps in governance, board operations, and succession planning.
Other key findings of the survey include:
Nearly half (49 percent) of respondents say they only review succession plans when a change in management requires it and 41 percent do not have leadership contingency plans.
More than 80 percent of respondents say their boards have no term or age limits on membership and one-third do not evaluate board members’ performance.
Deloitte believes that the needs of families in business are different from those of public corporations. Therefore, Deloitte Middle East’s Private Client Services offering is continuously adapting to ensure that it addresses all facets of a family’s wealth, including its human, intellectual, cultural, and financial capital.
Nauman Ahmed, regional tax leader at Deloitte Middle East, comments: “The aim of the PCS division is to provide business families with the tools they need to preserve and grow their wealth — both now and for generations to come. The appointment of Walid, with his extensive experience working closely with families in business, will further support our ability to better serve our clients and build on the technical capability that Deloitte is renowned for”.


Saudi Real Estate Refinance Co. plans up to $1.07bn sukuk sale this year

Updated 23 April 2019
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Saudi Real Estate Refinance Co. plans up to $1.07bn sukuk sale this year

  • The plan by SRC, a subsidiary of Saudi Arabia’s sovereign Public Investment Fund, comes as it prepares to purchase more home loan portfolios
  • SRC, formed in 2017, is also keen to tap foreign institutional investors for its debt sale this year

RIYADH: Saudi Real Estate Refinance Co. (SRC), modelled on US mortgage finance firm Fannie Mae, aims to issue up to 4 billion riyals ($1.07 billion) of long-term sukuk this year, its chief executive said on Tuesday.

The plan by SRC, a subsidiary of Saudi Arabia’s sovereign Public Investment Fund, comes as it prepares to purchase more home loan portfolios from mortgage financing companies and banks to boost the Kingdom’s secondary mortgage market.

SRC, formed in 2017, is also keen to tap foreign institutional investors for its debt sale this year, Fabrice Susini told Reuters in an interview.

“Our strategy is clearly to tap the market twice this year,” he said. “We are really looking at probably issuing something between ... 2 and 4 billion riyal that we may be issuing in two tranches.

He said SRC was looking at sukuk in the 10 to 15-year range, to help minimize refinancing risks. “Generally speaking we are trying to issue as long as possible,” Susini said.

He said the company was assessing whether it could also issue bonds in currencies other than the local riyal.

In March, SRC completed a 750 million riyal sukuk issue with multiple tenors, under a program that allows it to issue up to 11 billion riyals of local currency denominated Islamic bonds.

“The rule of the game for us is, like many projects across the Kingdom, attract liquidity from foreign investors,” Susini said.

He said SRC had spent 1.2 billion riyals from its balance sheet buying mortgages from local mortgage financing companies and provided liquidity to these firms.

It has also signed initial accords with several commercial banks to acquire housing mortgage portfolios.

Saudi Arabia’s housing ministry is targeting the mortgage market to reach a total value of 502 billion riyals by 2020 from around 300 billion riyals now.

The government wants to increase activity in the real estate market as it moves to revitalize the economy and is taking steps to reform the sector as part of its 2030 reform plan.

It has been working with developers and local banks to counter a shortage of affordable housing — one of the country’s biggest social and economic problems. Saudi Arabia wants 60 percent of its nationals to own homes by 2020, up from 47 percent in 2016.

The size of real estate financing relative to its gross domestic product is 5 percent in Saudi Arabia compared to 69 percent in the United States, 74 percent in the United Kingdom and 43 pct in Canada, the housing ministry has said.

“The goal of SRC in this market was to make sure that we will be able to refinance at least around 10 percent of the market in 2020, and 20 percent of the market by 2028,” Susini told Reuters.