Saudi establishes camel milk firm in California

Updated 02 July 2014
0

Saudi establishes camel milk firm in California

A young Saudi has established a company selling camel's milk in the United States, despite the animals reportedly being the source of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) coronavirus.
According to a report in a Los Angeles newspaper, Walid Abdulwahab, 23, set up the company as part of his class project at the University of Southern California.
The lighthearted slogan of his company, Desert Farms, is "Make every day a humpday."
Supplied by seven small camel farms, most of them owned by Amish, the Santa Monica-based company recently sold camel milk of $100,000, as it spreads its claims of nutritional and health benefits, the report stated.
"What we know about the camel milk is that, in terms of health, it outperforms every other dairy beverage," Abdulwahab reportedly said.
With no appreciable difference in taste from cow's milk, camel's has 50 percent less fat and about 40 fewer calories per cup. It also has about the same amounts of other nutrients. Desert Farms sells milk raw or pasteurized, with the pasteurized version in most stores, the report stated.
But it doesn't come cheap. A pint, or almost 500mls, costs $16 to $19 online (SR60 to SR71).
The report stated that Abdulwahab's project was inspired by a visit home to Saudi Arabia. After investing his own funds to launch in January, he now supplies camel's milk to stores in Northern California, in addition to selling it online.
Around 80 percent of its products are sold to families that have autistic children, because camel's milk apparently helps to improve the motor skills of these children.
"Camel milk has been used for centuries in the Middle East by nomads and Bedouins, and they swore by it," he said.
"That's why people have faith in it, it's a historical product."
While researching his class project, he learned that some farms in the West and Midwest, mostly owned by Amish, milked camels. He approached them, and soon seven small farms began supplying milk for Desert Farms, the report stated.
According to Abdulwahab, cows outnumber camels by about 18,000 to 1 in US, making cow's milk less pricey.
"Nobody has tested camel's milk scientifically," said Jay Gargus, director of the University of California Irvine Center for Autism Research and Translation.
After partnering with Christina Adams, a writer who has reported success with camel milk and her own son, the Irvine labs began tests this month to "see if there's some basis to it," he reportedly said.


Unique Riyadh car race brings in enthusiasts from all around

Costumized Hot Rods outside the Alloy Army garage area. (Supplied)
Updated 11 min 38 sec ago
0

Unique Riyadh car race brings in enthusiasts from all around

  • FJR racing team owner Falah Al-Jarba, who is participating for the first time with his 2019 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1, said he was impressed with the first round turnout and noted that the short notice of this event did not affect participation

RIYADH: The first round of the Saudi Time Attack race kicked off on the Reem race circuit yesterday. The 16-category race is unique in its participation since anyone can turn up and join in. Whether you are an everyday driver, enthusiast or would-be racer the Time Attack Race has a category for you.
“We target different types of drivers, usually people with a sports car or regular stock car who want to race their car to the max in a safe environment with other drivers,” said Prince Khalid bin Sultan Abdullah Al-Faisal, chairman of the Saudi Arabian Motor Federation (SAMF). He added that the target participants for this race are not necessarily professionals but rather enthusiasts, semi pros, amateurs, and beginners.
FJR racing team owner Falah Al-Jarba, who is participating for the first time with his 2019 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1, said he was impressed with the first round turnout and noted that the short notice of this event did not affect participation.
“It is not hard to get anyone on to the track — the hardest thing is to get them back again. Anyone who enters the race track three times of his own free will has the makings of a driver,” he said.

Passion
Prince Mohammed bin Saud bin Fahad bin Abdul Aziz Al-Saud, participating racer and owner of the MS7 racing team, said it is passion that attracts everyone to the race. “It is not a head-to-head race but it is competitive and it is fun. There is no pressure — everyone is here to have fun. I am happy that I participated,” he explained. This also marks a first for Saudi women racing as four women competed for the first time in a car race.
“For the first time we have a ladies category. These opportunities will be better reflected in two to three years’ time but if anyone would ask where did it start, it started here in this 2018 season,” said the “Camaro King” Falah Al-Jarba.
Prince Mohammed is very welcoming of any new competitor to the racing industry.
“At the end of the day if you have two hands, two legs and can drive that’s what it comes down to regardless of your gender, your weight, your height or your size, it is all about how well you can perform under pressure,” he said.
Prince Khalid expects a better turnout for female participants in the next round of the race scheduled for Nov. 16. He added that there has been a great interest in joining the race and wanted to clarify that anyone who wants to take part in the race does not need to have a race car.