Mobily to graduate 400 female interns

Updated 08 July 2014
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Mobily to graduate 400 female interns

Mobily will graduate 400 Saudi women as telecom technicians in a ceremony on Wednesday. Labor Minister Adel Fakeih will attend the graduation ceremony.
The women completed a series of courses in programming and maintenance of mobile phones as a part of an ambitious project Mobily adopted in 2013 in cooperation with the National Women's Institute in Jeddah. The institute is a one of the high quality institutes supervised by the General Organization for Technical and Vocational Training.
The program aims to train 1,000 Saudi women in the programming and maintenance of mobile phones over the next three years.
Hammoud Al-Ghobaini, executive manager of corporate communications at Mobily, said that this program, will give these women the opportunity to enter the professional, vocational and technical market especially as the Saudi market has a high demand for such specializations, particularly women workers.
Al-Ghobaini said that Mobily embraced this development program in all specialties, because the company believes in the importance of vocational and crafts training for women as it can lead them to setting up their own businesses.
He said that it is important that women be given the opportunity to show their creativity within a suitable environment with the tolerant laws of Islam.
Al- Ghobaini emphasized the importance of the social responsibility of companies. Mobily achieved this by adopting this project in cooperation with various government and private entities.
The women participants were beneficiaries of charity organizations and social institutions in Jeddah and the neighboring provinces and some of them suffer some form disability.
Amani Al-Zayla'i, director-general of the National Specialized Institute for Women's Training, said that participants were trained over past months in an interesting and nontraditional way by Saudi trainees that were specifically trained to work in the institute. This training was carried under the supervision of the Technical and Vocational Training Corporation represented by the Ahli training which provided all the support and advice to ensure the success of this program, which is the first of its kind in the Gulf.
Al-Zayla'i explained that the program comprised three developmental courses including an introduction of maintenance and programming services (applications) as well as hardware maintenance. She added that the program attracted a high number of candidates forcing the institute’s management to narrow the selection process.
The institute cooperated with seven partners from charitable and social bodies which are Al Bir Society Charity in Khlais, Association of Neighborhood Centers Province in Makkah, Women's First Charity Association, Iktifa Society, the National Committee for Prisoners, their Families and Ex-Convicts (Tarahum), the General Administration of Education in Jeddah represented by (the learned neighborhood) and Social Education House for Girls In Jeddah.


Saudi Arabia seeks to bridge cultural gaps with South Korea

Updated 6 min 3 sec ago
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Saudi Arabia seeks to bridge cultural gaps with South Korea

  • Seoul welcomed historical visit of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman to the country in 21 years
  • A grand cultural exhibition, part of Saudi's global cultural campaign titled “Bridges to Seoul,” to held for Koreans

SEOUL: A unique cultural festival filled with the music and dance of Saudi Arabia were attracting South Korean visitors at the heart of Seoul Thursday.
The festival is Saudi Arabia’s global cultural campaign titled “Bridges to Seoul” organized by the King Abdualaziz Center for World Culture marking the historical visit of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman to the country in 21 years.
“This Saudi Arabian cultural exhibition is the first in Asia,” Kim Hee-joo, a staffer for Ithra, told Arab News. “This main objective of this campaign is to promote Saudi Arabian cultures in South Korea, many of whose people are still unfamiliar with Saudi cultures despite the close relationship between the two governments.”
The exhibition, which runs from June 24 to July 3, is being held at the convention center of Grand Hilton Seoul. The exhibition offers an opportunity for South Koreans to experience the richness of Saudi culture and heritage.
Visitors can to try on Saudi costumes and accessories  for photo sessions and get their Saudi Arabian names written in Arabic script.
“We’re happy to share Saudi cultures with South Koreans. This is a great opportunity for introducing our cultures to South Koreans and bridging cultural gaps between the two countries,” said Muhammed alduhaim at the photo costume booth.
South Korean visitors were enjoying the exhibition with great interest.
“When you talk about Saudi Arabia here, many people including me just think of desert extremely hot weather and something like that,” Choi Bok-nam, 55, said. “However, I’m impressed to see beautiful flower and get to know Saudi’s weather conditions vary after seeing pictures displayed here. I want to travel to Saudi next time.”
For some elder men, who had been in Saudi Arabia for work, the exhibition offered a chance to reminiscent of the old days in Saudi.
“I had worked at Saudi Arabia as an engineer for a year about 30 years ago,” Lim Joo-hwan, 64, said. “This event makes me reminisce about the days in Saudi, and actually I’ve learned new aspects of Saudi cultures here though I lived there just for a year.”
Joo Duk-choon, 76, was fascinated by Taif roses and products made from the local flower.
“I had little knowledge of Saudi Arabia. I thought Saudi was just an oil-rich nation.” he said.
Hanan, 29, from Saudi Arabia said there still need to be communications programs to spread Saudi cultures to South Korea.
“I think South Koreans don’t know about Saudi Arabia as much as Saudi Arabians know about Korea,” said Hannah, who have studied at a Korean university for international studies. “Young generation in Saudi Arabia know much about Korean hallyu (the Korean wave of pop culture), dramas, cultures, but I feel Saudi Arabia doesn’t enough media and stories they can tell to South Koreans.”
She hoped the crown prince’s latest visit to South Korea would be a turning point for getting ever closer between the people of Saudi Arabia and South Korea.
“I feel like the crown prince has made a lot of changes in Saudi, especially for women, media and culture, so I think it’s changing a lot,” she added.
Prince Mohammed spearheads the Vision 2030 economic reform plan aimed at diversifying the Kingdom’s oil dependent economic structure to other industry fields, such as culture and tourism as well as information and communications technology and new sources of energy like hydrogen.