HRDF report: Few jobs for women, disabled

Updated 11 May 2016

HRDF report: Few jobs for women, disabled

JEDDAH: The Human Resource Development Fund (HRDF), in its annual report tabled recently at the Shoura Council, has taken serious note of less jobs available for women and handicapped citizens.
The challenges include lack of transport, companies having inadequate facilities, and Saudis preferring government jobs.
In addition, many citizens do not have the skills to apply for jobs, such as writing a resume, or do not have qualifications for certain positions, according to a local media report recently.
The HRDF has suggested that measures must be introduced to create jobs for women and people with disabilities in rural areas, including working from home. There also has to be statistics compiled on how much expatriates earn in relation to Saudis.
Shoura member Prince Khalid Al-Saud said the Taqat program has only matched 4 percent of applicants with jobs suitable for them. The HRDF’s ability to reduce unemployment must be reviewed, he said.
He said 81,000 young men and 700,000 women applied, with 25 percent of men found jobs, while less than 2 percent of women were employed. In addition, more people received support under the Hafiz program than those who found employment. He said this raised serious questions about the training provided for applicants, and whether this matched the needs of the labor market. The HRDF had spent more than SR5 billion on training 250,000 people, he said.
Mohammad Al-Raheili said he was concerned about the delays in providing awards for teachers at private schools. This was resulting in more resignations and teachers seeking better prospects in the public sector. Member Abdullah Al-Jighman said the fund should have produced a report about job turnover, particularly since 33 percent of those who received training left the private sector to find jobs in the government sector.


Two new academies to boost Saudi arts, heritage and music

Updated 47 min 14 sec ago

Two new academies to boost Saudi arts, heritage and music

  • One academy specializing in heritage and traditional arts and crafts will start receiving applications in autumn 2020
  • A second academy dedicated to music will receive 1,000 students and trainees from 2021

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia is to set up arts academies, including two in the next two years, offering a step toward academic qualification and enlarging the Kingdom’s footprint in heritage, arts and crafts, and music.

The initiative is part of the Ministry of Culture’s Quality of Life program. 

The minister, Prince Badr bin Abdullah bin Mohammed bin Farhan, said investment in “capacity building” was one of the most important elements in encouraging the cultural sector, which enjoyed unlimited support from King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

The Kingdom was rich in diverse arts, talents and artistic production, Prince Badr said, and the academies would be a first step toward academic qualification in the arts within the Kingdom.

One academy specializing in heritage and traditional arts and crafts will start receiving applications in autumn 2020, targeting 1,000 students and trainees in long- and short-term programs. 

A second academy dedicated to music will receive 1,000 students and trainees from 2021.

The music academy in particular will be “the core of music production and talent development in Saudi Arabia,” Saudi musician, composer and producer Mamdouh Saif told Arab News.

The music industry was a large and diverse field, Saif said, and education was crucial. 

“The academy is the right place to launch the music industry in Saudi Arabia, and it will have a significant impact on Saudi youth, and young people in surrounding countries,” he said.

He expects “a very high turnout” for the academy among young Saudis. 

“Due to my expertise in this area, I receive many questions from people who want to learn music, but through private lessons,” he said.

“But the availability of an academy for this purpose, that teaches music in a methodological way, will be the right start for those interested in music.”