No income tax, but VAT starts in 2018

Saudi Minister of Finance Ibrahim Al-Assaf. (AP)
Updated 05 May 2016
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No income tax, but VAT starts in 2018

RIYADH: The Kingdom does not plan to introduce income tax for individuals, but value-added tax (VAT) would be introduced by 2018, according to Saudi Finance Minister Ibrahim Al-Assaf.
Al-Assaf said Wednesday in a statement that the decision to introduce VAT had been agreed upon at the 102nd meeting of GCC finance ministers in Riyadh. The discussions had taken place at a gathering of the Committee on Financial and Economic Cooperation, which includes ministers from other GCC states.
The decision was based on an agreement taken by the Supreme GCC Council earlier this year to introduce VAT in the six GCC countries, said Assaf. It was agreed that VAT would be introduced by 2018.
Al-Assaf said VAT, which would be imposed on certain commodities, was much easier to administer than other taxes, many of which were easy to evade.

In an interview with The Economist in January, Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, second deputy premier and defense minister, had indicated that VAT would be introduced but no income, or wealth taxes. “We’re talking about taxes or fees that are supported by the citizen, including VAT and the sin tax. They will create good revenues, but not the only revenues,” he was quoted as saying. Other reports indicate that the GCC bloc would introduce VAT of up to 5 percent. The tax would exclude 95 food items, but would be applicable for all citizens and residents. Health, education and social services would likely be excluded.
Introducing VAT is considered a major economic reform in the GCC countries, which have minimal tax systems and no tax on income, although some levy fees such as road tolls.
To limit smuggling and damage to competitiveness, analysts say, the Gulf countries should introduce VAT regionally rather than individually, at different times.
According to analysts, VAT could provide a number of benefits to the GCC countries. If levied at a rate of 5 percent, it could yield anywhere from 0.8 percent to 1.6 percent of gross domestic product, depending on the country.


Saudi Aramco recognized as a leader in the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Updated 22 January 2019
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Saudi Aramco recognized as a leader in the Fourth Industrial Revolution

JEDDAH: Saudi Aramco’s Uthmaniyah Gas Plant (UGP) has been recognized by the World Economic Forum (WEF) as a “Lighthouse” manufacturing facility and a leader in technology applications of the Fourth Industrial Revolution. 
Saudi Aramco is the first energy company globally to be included in this select group of manufacturing sites. The plant is also the only facility in the Middle East to be recognized by WEF. 
The announcement was made ahead of WEFs annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland.
The gas plant is one of the world’s largest gas processing plants and was commissioned in 1981 as part of Saudi Aramco’s Master Gas System to process associated gas from oil wells. 
The use of drones and wearable technologies to inspect pipelines and machinery has helped cut inspection time by 90% in this industrial facility.
“The recognition of the Uthmaniyah Gas Plant demonstrates Saudi Aramco’s shift to transform and adapt in the rapidly changing global energy landscape. Uthmaniyah is only one part of our large integrated energy value chain where IR 4.0 technologies are playing a critical role to enable significant capital and operational efficiencies,” said Amin H. Nasser, Chief Executive Officer of Saudi Aramco.
The seven new facilities join nine other “Manufacturing Lighthouses” which WEF unveiled in September 2018. The 16 factories were selected from an initial list of 1,000 manufacturers based on their successful implementation of cutting-edge technologies of the future that drive financial and operational impact.
The “Lighthouse” program was conducted by WEF in collaboration with McKinsey during a year-long study. A study team visited UGP in Saudi Arabia and performed a thorough audit.