King orders tuition paid for person with visual impairment

Updated 21 October 2016

King orders tuition paid for person with visual impairment

JEDDAH: Prince Sultan bin Salman, president of the Association for Disabled Children, has thanked Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques King Salman for ordering the state to bear the cost of a postgraduate program undertaken by Muhanned bin Jabreel Abu Diah, a person with special needs, at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals.
Prince Sultan said that this generous initiative is just another proof of the care the Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques shows to all citizens, and especially to people with disabilities.
The prince said that the association has been supported by the Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques for 30 years, and this support helped attain all the achievements and developments marked by the association in rehabilitation programs and various services to this category of citizens, as well as in raising awareness about the issue and help alleviate some of its negative impacts.
Prince Sultan also praised Abu Diah’s efforts and drive to complete his academic studies, calling him a model citizen wishing to serve his country.
Abu Diah suffers from visual impairment as a result of a traffic accident he had when in high school. Despite the handicap, he completed his undergraduate studies in industrial engineering at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals.
He has some patented innovations and published 10 books on scientific innovations. He is a co-founder of the Saudi Innovators' Association.


Two new academies to boost Saudi arts, heritage and music

Updated 57 min 38 sec ago

Two new academies to boost Saudi arts, heritage and music

  • One academy specializing in heritage and traditional arts and crafts will start receiving applications in autumn 2020
  • A second academy dedicated to music will receive 1,000 students and trainees from 2021

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia is to set up arts academies, including two in the next two years, offering a step toward academic qualification and enlarging the Kingdom’s footprint in heritage, arts and crafts, and music.

The initiative is part of the Ministry of Culture’s Quality of Life program. 

The minister, Prince Badr bin Abdullah bin Mohammed bin Farhan, said investment in “capacity building” was one of the most important elements in encouraging the cultural sector, which enjoyed unlimited support from King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

The Kingdom was rich in diverse arts, talents and artistic production, Prince Badr said, and the academies would be a first step toward academic qualification in the arts within the Kingdom.

One academy specializing in heritage and traditional arts and crafts will start receiving applications in autumn 2020, targeting 1,000 students and trainees in long- and short-term programs. 

A second academy dedicated to music will receive 1,000 students and trainees from 2021.

The music academy in particular will be “the core of music production and talent development in Saudi Arabia,” Saudi musician, composer and producer Mamdouh Saif told Arab News.

The music industry was a large and diverse field, Saif said, and education was crucial. 

“The academy is the right place to launch the music industry in Saudi Arabia, and it will have a significant impact on Saudi youth, and young people in surrounding countries,” he said.

He expects “a very high turnout” for the academy among young Saudis. 

“Due to my expertise in this area, I receive many questions from people who want to learn music, but through private lessons,” he said.

“But the availability of an academy for this purpose, that teaches music in a methodological way, will be the right start for those interested in music.”