Saudi stylist’s high fashion advice for the average guy

Combo image of photos taken by Taha Baageel
Updated 30 October 2016
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Saudi stylist’s high fashion advice for the average guy

Men’s fashion is mostly about sticking to classic outfits that work for all. This means, only a few would dare to think out of the box and be creative with their everyday wear.
Today, men are spending more time choosing carefully what to wear according to international trends and globally celebrated brands.
Arab News teamed up with men’s image consultant and stylist Faisal Al-Ghazzawi, who came up with the top trends men should follow this season.
“Style is key to show one’s personality, it is a window to your character that can make people learn more about you without you even saying anything,” said Al-Ghazzawi. “Here in Saudi Arabia, many men like to stick to basics and either wear our traditional thobes or go with simple jeans and a t-shirt. We constantly like to introduce them to fun and stylish trends that are invading the fashion scene and which are totally wearable,” he added.
Below are a number of trends that Al-Ghazzawi chose from local and international brands, modeled by him.

Fun, colorful pins:

Pins are stylish items that can be added to any outfit such as t-shirts, jackets, pants and even hats and shoes. The trick is to wear the pin on plain clothing with no prints and patterns to allow it to shine and make a statement. Pins are considered an accessory, meaning you do not need to add any other accessory item so as not to distract the whole outfit but if you do decide to wear some accessories, try to move away from the pins, you can add some bracelets in basic colors.

Modern samurai:

Bomber jackets have been invading the fashion scene now. I recommend going with a classic black jacket that allows you to add as many outfit details as you want.
The belt on top of the t-shirt and under the bomber jacket is a reflection of a trendy samurai inspiration. On the bomber jacket, I added a small pin to reflect modernity. The bandana textile has been trendy for a while now, you can wear it as a t-shirt, cap or anything. In this look, I choose it to be a scarf chocker as a support accessory to put the look together. Another accessory style follows the trend of stacking up bracelets; in this look I stacked together a number of black wooden bracelets. To top it all, I added a hat to reflect this season’s trend to bring the whole outfit together.

Simple but vibrant:

A basic white t-shirt with jeans is a classic look. You can break the color scheme with a royal blue long and skinny scarf wrapped around the neck, matching it with fashionable shoes. The pop of color is the reason why this look is stylish. To make the look perfect, wear airy blue sunglasses, as they are one of the top 10 colors for this season. This shows that simple additions can give the look a whole new perspective.

Comfy sporty:

Black and white are always in for any season and for any place. You can choose a simple sweater with a hoodie along with matching pants and sneakers. The look here stresses on the sweater’s design, where you can be daring and vibrant with basic colors and simple style.

Winter 2016 is all set to begin on a stylish note. Milan and London fashion weeks included many trends for this season, one of the colors that was dominant on the catwalk was grey, in addition to vibrant colors such as flaring red and blue. Some of the most popular designers chose long wool coats that fell just off the shoulder to give a slouchy, oversized look. You need to look for the layering up trend where you can wear jackets, sweaters, shirts or all of them together at once. Finally, the square pattern was seen on all sorts of clothing from jackets, coats, pants, sweaters to hats and scarves.

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Worth the sting: Cuba’s scorpion pain remedy

Farmer Pepe Casanas poses with a scorpion in Los Palacios, Cuba, December 5, 2018. Picture taken December 5, 2018. (REUTERS)
Updated 16 December 2018
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Worth the sting: Cuba’s scorpion pain remedy

  • In Cuba, where tens of thousands of patients have been treated with Vidatox, each vial costs under a dollar
  • The scorpions are caught in the wild as Labiofam workers believe their venom — which is not dangerous — is not as potent when raised in captivity

HAVANA: Once a month for the last decade, Pepe Casanas, a 78-year-old Cuban farmer, has hunted down a scorpion to sting himself with, vowing that the venom wards off his rheumatism pains.
His natural remedy is no longer seen as very unusual here.
Researchers in Cuba have found that the venom of the blue scorpion, whose scientific name is Rhopalurus junceus, endemic to the Caribbean island, appears to have anti-inflammatory and pain relief properties, and may be able to delay tumor growth in some cancer patients.
While some oncologists abroad say more research is needed to be able to properly back up such a claim, Cuban pharmaceutical firm Labiofam has been using scorpion venom since 2011 to manufacture the homeopathic medicine Vidatox.
The remedy has proven popular.
Labiofam Business Director Carlos Alberto Delgado told Reuters sales were climbing 10 percent annually. Vidatox already sells in around 15 countries worldwide and is currently in talks with China to sell the remedy there.
In Cuba, where tens of thousands of patients have been treated with Vidatox, each vial costs under a dollar. On the black market abroad it can cost hundred times that — retailers on Amazon.com are seen selling them for up to $140.
“I put the scorpion where I feel pain,” Casanas said while demonstrating his homemade pain relief with a scorpion that he found under a pile of debris on the patch of land he cultivates in Cuba’s western province of Pinar del Rio.
After squeezing it long enough, it stung him and he winced.
“It hurts for a while, but then it calms and goes and I don’t have any more pain,” he said.
Casanas, a leathery-skinned former tobacco farmer who now primarily grows beans for his own consumption, said he sometimes keeps a scorpion under his straw hat like a lucky charm.
It likes the shade and humidity, he says, so just curls up and sleeps.

FROM FARM TO LAB
In a Labiofam laboratory in the southern Cuban city of Cienfuegos, workers dressed in scrubs and hairnets tend to nearly 6,000 scorpions housed in plastic containers lined up on rows of metal racks.
Every few days they feed and water the arachnids that sit on a bed of small stones. Once a month, they apply an 18V electrical jolt to their tails using a handcrafted machine in order to trigger the release of a few drops of venom.
The venom is then diluted with distilled water and shaken vigorously, which homeopathic practitioners believe activates its “vital energy.”
The scorpions are caught in the wild as Labiofam workers believe their venom — which is not dangerous — is not as potent when raised in captivity.
After two years of exploitation in the “escorpionario,” they are released back into the wild.
Dr. Fabio Linares, the head of Labiofam’s homeopathic medicine laboratory who developed the medicine, said Vidatox stimulates the body’s natural defense mechanisms.
“After four to five years (of taking it), the doctor whose care I was in told me that my cancer hadn’t advanced,” said Cuban patient Jose Manuel Alvarez Acosta, who was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2008.
Still, Labiofam recommends Vidatox as a supplemental treatment and says it should not replace conventional ones.