Yemen govt urges UN envoy to work on new road map

Updated 12 November 2016
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Yemen govt urges UN envoy to work on new road map

JEDDAH: The Yemeni government announced on Friday that it can accept the UN envoy’s peace plan only if it takes into consideration three key issues: The UN Security Council Resolution 2216; the GCC initiative and the outcome of the Yemeni national dialogue.
Abdulmalek Al-Mekhlafi, Yemeni deputy prime minister and foreign minister, stressed the need for UN envoy Ismail Oul Cheikh Ahmed to work on developing a new road map that takes into account the terms of reference and other points agreed upon during previous negotiations in Switzerland and Kuwait.
“This is essential for Yemen to enjoy real and sustainable peace,” he said.
During his talks with Vladimir Didoshkin, Russian ambassador to Yemen, and Katsuhiko Hayashi, Japan’s ambassador to Yemen, the minister confirmed the legitimate government’s rejection of the UN envoy’s road map, which is not based on the agreed upon outcomes of the Gulf initiative, the National Dialogue Conference and the UN Security Council Resolution 2216.
The Yemeni government’s official media said the foreign minister discussed bilateral relations and the latest developments in Yemen with the ambassadors. The talks also focused on the road map, which was rejected by the Yemeni government.
The minister praised the support of the two countries for Yemen and its legitimate government.
He thanked the Japanese government for granting Yemen 470 million yen ($6.5 million) in food aid through the World Food Program.
The Russian ambassador said his government has approved the provision of urgent aid worth $3 million to Yemen.
Ould Cheikh Ahmed faced yet another failure last week when Yemeni President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi and other Yemeni officials rejected a meeting with him in Riyadh.
The UN envoy left Riyadh for New York after spending three days in Riyadh, during which he met with Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and the ambassadors of 18 countries that sponsor the political process in Yemen.
This coincided with the continuation of military operations in several fronts in Yemen, most notably in Nahm, northeast of Sanaa, where heavy combat took place Thursday as the national army and popular resistance moved toward Yam and Al-Sawdaa’ Mountains after destroying militia positions.
Coalition aircraft, meanwhile, continued their raids on several militia military bases in Mount Al-Taweel and Bani Hasheesh west of Nahm. They also bombed forces loyal to ousted president Saleh in Wadi Jardan south of Sanaa.
Al-Thawra General Hospital, the largest hospital in Taiz, announced the suspension of many of its outpatient, radiology, and laboratory services due to a lack of financial support for the hospital.
The hospital was now attending only to emergency cases, said its director Ahmed Anaam.
He appealed to concerned officials and international humanitarian organizations to intervene and address the deteriorating health situation in Taiz, resulting from ongoing violations by Houthi militias.
Abdullah Dahan, Yemeni deputy minister of health and housing, said the hospital has been bombed repeatedly, while a blockade by militias of Taiz has prevented the entry of logistical materials.


Libya’s Haftar says to fight until Tripoli ‘militias’ defeated

Updated 25 min 5 sec ago
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Libya’s Haftar says to fight until Tripoli ‘militias’ defeated

  • Haftar had justified the offensive last month by saying he was fighting against “private militias and extremist groups”
  • 100,000 people are feared trapped by the clashes raging on the outskirts of Tripoli

PARIS: Libyan strongman Khalifa Haftar, who is leading a military offensive against the UN-recognized government in Tripoli, said in an interview published Sunday he will continue fighting until militias in the city laid down their arms.
Haftar had justified the offensive last month by saying he was fighting against “private militias and extremist groups” who he said were gaining influence in the capital under Prime Minister Fayez Al-Sarraj.
“Of course a political solution is the objective,” Haftar told the Journal de Dimanche newspaper in France. “But to return to politics, we need to finish with the militias.
“The problem in Tripoli is a security one.”
He offered an amnesty to fighters in Tripoli who laid down their arms, saying they would be allowed to “return home safe and sound.”
He also took aim at UN mediator Ghassan Salame, who has warned the country is “committing suicide” due to a conflict that 6-10 foreign states are involved in.
“Salame is making irresponsible statements,” Haftar said. “He wasn’t like that before, he has changed. From an impartial and honest mediator, he has become a biased one.”
Salame has warned that Haftar’s offensive is “just the start of a long and bloody war.”
More than 75,000 people have been driven from their homes in the latest fighting and 510 have been killed, according to the World Health Organization.
More than 2,400 have also been wounded, while 100,000 people are feared trapped by the clashes raging on the outskirts of Tripoli.