France, OIC flay Israeli bill to legalize settler homes

A general view of the Israeli outpost, a wildcat Jewish settlements built on private Palestinian land, of Mitzpe Dani in the occupied West Bank on Tuesday. (AFP)
Updated 16 November 2016
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France, OIC flay Israeli bill to legalize settler homes

JEDDAH: The Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) strongly condemned a bill by the Israeli occupation government aimed at legitimizing colonial settlement areas in the occupied Palestinian territories including Al-Quds Al-Shareef.
In a statement issued on Tuesday, it stated that these illegitimate measures undertaken by Israel with a view to consolidating its occupation and colonial settlement are null and void by virtue of international law and relevant UN resolutions.
The OIC also strongly condemned the Israeli escalation represented by the endorsement of a bill banning the adhan (call for prayer) in the mosques in the occupied city of Al-Quds and its suburbs, underscoring that these serious measures are part of Israel’s racist practices and continued aggressions on Islamic holy sites. These practices also constitute a grave violation of the freedom of worship and of the inviolability of sacred sites, and a violation of the international humanitarian law.
The OIC warned against the persistence of such Israeli racist practices and aggressions which could fuel religious conflict, extremism and violence in the region. It also called on the international community, particularly the Security Council, to assume its responsibility and put an end to these repeated serious Israeli violations against sacred places.
In an earlier press release, the Muslim body condemned the terrorist attack on the German Consulate in Mazar-e-Sharif, Afghanistan, on Friday, leading to the death of at least six civilians.
In a press release, the OIC general secretariat emphasized the inviolability of the premises and members of diplomatic missions, and called on the Afghan authorities to bring the perpetrators of this terrorist attack to justice.
It extended its condolences to the families of the victims and wished the wounded quick recovery.
Meanwhile, France said that the Israeli bill was of a matter of deep concern and jeopardized a two-state solution.
“This proposed law, if it were adopted, would once again jeopardize a two-state solution and would contribute in worsening tensions on the ground. France is deeply concerned by it,” Foreign Ministry spokesman Romain Nadal said in a daily briefing.

— With agencies


Egypt opens museum to honor Naguib Mahfouz

Foreign visitor reads the biography of the late Egyptian writer Naguib Mahfouz after the official opening of the museum in Cairo, Egypt, July 14, 2019. Picture taken July 14, 2019. (REUTERS)
Updated 10 min 28 sec ago
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Egypt opens museum to honor Naguib Mahfouz

  • The two-storey building in Cairo’s Gamaliya district is near to where the author was born and the area was the inspiration for many of his stories and characters

CAIRO: A museum commemorating the life and works of Egyptian novelist Naguib Mahfouz has opened in Cairo, nearly 13 years after the Nobel laureate’s death.
The Naguib Mahfouz Museum and Creativity Centre houses the belongings and personal library of Mahfouz, who won the 1988 Nobel Prize for Literature — the only Arab to do so.
The center, in a redeveloped building dating back to 1774, had been planned for years but had been delayed by financial and other issues.
“I hope this museum becomes a center of cultural radiation and a tourist attraction,” Egyptian Culture Minister Inas Abdel Dayem said at the opening ceremony.
The two-storey building in Cairo’s Gamaliya district is near to where the author was born and the area was the inspiration for many of his stories and characters.

“I hope this museum becomes a center of cultural radiation and a tourist attraction.”

                                       Inas Abdel Dayem, Egypt’s culture minister

As well as displaying some of his personal belongings and handwritten texts, the museum includes a hall containing all his works, in modern and old editions, as well as seminar rooms, an audiovisual library and a library housing research and studies on Mahfouz’s works. His Nobel medal, however, is not on display and remains with his family.
Mahfouz’s daughter Umm Kulthum, who attended the opening, said she was happy that the dream of building the museum had been realized “after years of waiting.”