Saudi paper apologizes for inaccurate reporting on Aramco IPO

Al-Eqtisadiah
Updated 25 December 2016
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Saudi paper apologizes for inaccurate reporting on Aramco IPO

Al-Eqtisadiah on Sunday retracted a news item and apologized for the misinformation in a previously published report regarding the Saudi Aramco privatization plan.
 
The daily said in its retraction that the article stated that the privatization project was introduced as part of the Kingdom’s Vision 2030, and not the National Transformation Program 2020.
 
A number of media outlets such as AFP and Arab News quoted the story as was reported by the Saudi economic daily, Al-Eqtisadiah.
 
The daily added that the share amount which will be offered for sale is different than the figures published in its article, adding that the 5 per cent the daily claimed was far from reality and completely wrong.
 
Moreover, Al-Eqtisadiah's article was not based on any scientific analysis or any credible source, and the figures mentioned in the analysis were in Saudi riyals when it should have been in dollars, the daily said.
 
"Al-Eqtisadiah apologies to its valued readers and urges all media outlets that published the report to publish the above apology and clarification. The newspaper will investigate the publication of this misinformation," said the daily.
 


Saudi Arabia ‘strongly condemns’ Houthi attack on Yemen UN monitors

Updated 14 min 50 sec ago
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Saudi Arabia ‘strongly condemns’ Houthi attack on Yemen UN monitors

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia on Friday strongly condemned the targeting of “UN personnel by the Iran-backed Houthi militia in Yemen” after cease-fire monitors came under fire.
The attack took place on Thursday in Hodeidah, where a truce agreed in talks in Sweden came into force last month.
The Houthi militia “have violated their signed commitments in Stockholm and continue to flout international law and escalate their aggression against the Yemeni people,” Saudi Arabia’s Ambassador to the United States Prince Khalid bin Salman tweeted on Friday.


The UN said one round of small arms fire struck a UN-marked armored vehicle that was part of convoy carrying chief monitor Patrick Cammaert.
The UN monitors arrived in Hodeida — the entry point for the bulk of Yemen’s imports — on Dec. 23. The UN Security Council this week agreed to expand the force to 75 monitors.