‘Civil march for Aleppo’ leaves Berlin

Demonstrators attend the Civil March for Aleppo in Berlin on Dec. 26, 2016.(AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)
Updated 28 December 2016
0

‘Civil march for Aleppo’ leaves Berlin

BERLIN: About 400 peace activists were marching Tuesday from the outskirts of Berlin toward the devastated Syrian city of Aleppo, heading down the refugee trail in reverse.
Organized by Polish journalist and blogger Anna Alboth, the “Civil March for Aleppo” aims to build political pressure to help civilians caught up in the Syrian conflict.
Carrying white flags and hiking backpacks and wearing outdoor gear against the cold and wet December weather, the marchers had on Monday left from the center of Berlin.
Alboth told Germany’s left-leaning Tageszeitung daily that only a core group of 30 activists planned to walk all the way, adding that she expected they may be blocked at the Turkish border.
“The true purpose of the march is that the civilians in Syria get access to humanitarian aid,” she said. “We are marching to build pressure.”
The starting point was the disused airfield of the Nazi-era Tempelhof airport, which during the Cold War became the hub for the Berlin airlift and now houses several thousands refugees from Syria, Iraq and other countries.
The marchers plan to cover around 20 km a day and walk through the Czech Republic, Austria and several western Balkan countries to Turkey — and then on to Syria.
It is the route into Europe that was taken last year by more than a million people, many fleeing battlefields in Syria and elsewhere in the Middle East, with the majority ending up in the top EU economy Germany.
Several thousand people have pledged on Facebook they would join at least a section of the about 3,000-km trek bound for Syria’s second city, which is now squarely under the regime control.


Yemeni spokesman says militants seek to ignite Hodeidah fighting

Updated 21 March 2019
0

Yemeni spokesman says militants seek to ignite Hodeidah fighting

  • Renewed fighting in Hodeidah would risk severing the main passage for humanitarian aid
  • A senior Houthi member earlier said a withdrawal is “impossible”

CAIRO: Yemen’s militants are igniting more conflict by their refusal to give up control of the key port city of Hodeida, the focus of months of UN-brokered talks, a government spokesman said.
Renewed fighting in Hodeidah would risk severing the main passage for humanitarian aid to the rest of the country, including northern Yemen, a heartland of the Houthi militants.
Rageh Badi, spokesman for the internationally recognized Yemen government, denounced remarks by senior militant leader Mohammed Ali Al-Houthi who earlier this week told The Associated Press that the Saudi-led coalition, which backs the government side in the conflict, is trying to change the terms of the agreement struck last year in Sweden and that a militant withdrawal would therefore be “impossible.”
Badi told reporters at a press conference Wednesday in the southern city of Aden that such remarks could set off renewed fighting in Hodeidah, the key entry point for international aid to the war-torn country, and violate the tentative peace agreement reached by the two sides in Sweden.
The remarks are a “renunciation of the Hodeidah agreement and a declaration of war,” Badi said, urging the UN to step up pressure on the rebels to prevent another “explosion of the situation” in Hodeidah. Otherwise, renewed fighting is just a “few days” away, he added.