Saudi Arabia bans poultry products from 6 countries

Heat-processed poultry products are treated in a way that destroys the avian flu virus and are excluded from the temporary ban.
Updated 06 January 2017

Saudi Arabia bans poultry products from 6 countries

RIYADH: An outbreak of avian influenza prompted the Kingdom to ban imports of poultry products temporarily from six bird flu-affected European and Asian countries.
The Saudi Food and Drug Authority (SFDA) confirmed the temporary ban on imports of poultry meat and eggs after the World Organization for Animal Health reported an avian influenza outbreak.
Announcing the ban late Wednesday, the SFDA said: “The authority has temporarily banned the importing of poultry meat, eggs, their products and equipment from provinces and districts in five countries due to the outbreak of a highly virulent avian influenza.”
“The ban affects Bacs-Kiskun county in Hungary, Kherson province in Ukraine, Lubuskie province in Poland, Friesland county in the Netherlands and provinces of Tarn-et-Garonne and Aveyron in France,” the SFDA said in a statement.
Poultry products from other provinces in these countries, which are thermally processed and certified to be free of bird flu, are not affected.
Heat-processed poultry products are treated in a way that destroys the avian flu virus, and are excluded from the temporary ban.
The Kingdom also temporarily banned imports of poultry products from India due to a bird flu outbreak, the commercial section of the Indian Embassy told Arab News on Thursday.
A senior official from the embassy said that the SFDA has decided to impose a temporary ban on the import of live birds, hatching eggs and chickens from India due to the outbreak of pathogenic avian influenza.
He added that such bans, however, are periodically reviewed and lifted as and when the situation returns to normal.
The Kingdom, the second-largest importer of chicken broiler meat in the world, on previous occasions imposed similar bans on poultry imports from other countries after avian influenza outbreaks, and lifted them when the situation returned to normal.
The avian virus, popularly known as bird flu, is the highly pathogenic H5N2 strain.


Two new academies to boost Saudi arts, heritage and music

Updated 19 August 2019

Two new academies to boost Saudi arts, heritage and music

  • One academy specializing in heritage and traditional arts and crafts will start receiving applications in autumn 2020
  • A second academy dedicated to music will receive 1,000 students and trainees from 2021

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia is to set up arts academies, including two in the next two years, offering a step toward academic qualification and enlarging the Kingdom’s footprint in heritage, arts and crafts, and music.

The initiative is part of the Ministry of Culture’s Quality of Life program. 

The minister, Prince Badr bin Abdullah bin Mohammed bin Farhan, said investment in “capacity building” was one of the most important elements in encouraging the cultural sector, which enjoyed unlimited support from King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

The Kingdom was rich in diverse arts, talents and artistic production, Prince Badr said, and the academies would be a first step toward academic qualification in the arts within the Kingdom.

One academy specializing in heritage and traditional arts and crafts will start receiving applications in autumn 2020, targeting 1,000 students and trainees in long- and short-term programs. 

A second academy dedicated to music will receive 1,000 students and trainees from 2021.

The music academy in particular will be “the core of music production and talent development in Saudi Arabia,” Saudi musician, composer and producer Mamdouh Saif told Arab News.

The music industry was a large and diverse field, Saif said, and education was crucial. 

“The academy is the right place to launch the music industry in Saudi Arabia, and it will have a significant impact on Saudi youth, and young people in surrounding countries,” he said.

He expects “a very high turnout” for the academy among young Saudis. 

“Due to my expertise in this area, I receive many questions from people who want to learn music, but through private lessons,” he said.

“But the availability of an academy for this purpose, that teaches music in a methodological way, will be the right start for those interested in music.”