Top brass: KSA determined to prevent Daesh from destabilizing world

Saudi Arabia is a target of terrorists, but is determined to continue its efforts against terrorism, said Lt. Gen. Abdulrahman bin Saleh Al-Bunian, president of the chiefs of staff.
Updated 15 January 2017
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Top brass: KSA determined to prevent Daesh from destabilizing world

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia will host in Riyadh on Sunday a conference of heads of the general staff of 14 allied countries fighting against Daesh.
The delegates will discuss increasing coordination between participating countries to serve regional and international security.
The meeting aims to enhance efforts by the alliance, which has achieved tangible progress in recent operations against the terrorist organization.
Lt. Gen. Abdulrahman bin Saleh Al-Bunian, president of the chiefs of staff, said the Kingdom’s hosting of the conference under the leadership of King Salman reflects continued Saudi commitment to international efforts against terrorist organizations, foremost among them Daesh.
Al-Bunian said the Kingdom is a target of terrorists, but is determined to continue its efforts against terrorism and to take all necessary measures via its military alliance to target Daesh in Syria and Iraq and prevent it from destabilizing the region and the world.
He said the Kingdom is working with the international alliance via intellectual, financial and security paths to weaken such organizations and criminalize anyone who offers them help.
The countries participating in the conference are Jordan, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the US, Bahrain, Turkey, Tunisia, Saudi Arabia, Oman, Qatar, Kuwait, Lebanon, Malaysia, Morocco and Nigeria.
Saudi Arabia was among the first countries to call for forming an alliance against terrorist organizations on all levels.
After the declaration of the alliance in September 2014, Riyadh offered $500 million for relief work in Iraq. It has also participated in air sorties against Daesh, and exchanged intelligence with participating countries.
Ash Carter, US defense secretary, recently said that President-elect Donald Trump must commit to “destroying the tumor of Daesh” by leading the fight against the extremist group. “There is a need for the US to remain actively engaged as leader of this coalition,” he said while addressing members of the Global Coalition against Daesh at its meeting in London on Dec. 19.
Meanwhile, the terrorist group on Saturday launched one of its fiercest assaults yet on the besieged Syrian city of Deir Ez Zor, leaving more than 30 regime fighters and radicals dead.
The brutal attack — on a day that saw many outbreaks of violence across Syria — came as the political opposition said it “supported” upcoming peace talks in the Kazakh capital Astana.


Two police officers killed after terror suspect blows himself up near Al-Azhar Mosque in Cairo

Updated 19 February 2019
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Two police officers killed after terror suspect blows himself up near Al-Azhar Mosque in Cairo

  • The blast also killed the bomber and injured three other policemen
  • Egypt’s tourism industry has been struggling to recover from attacks and domestic instability

CAIRO: Two police officers were killed when a terror suspect blew himself up after he was surrounded by police near Al-Azhar Mosque in Cairo on Monday.

The blast in the crowded Darb Al-Ahmar district also killed the bomber and injured three other policemen, the interior ministry said.

“As security surrounded the man and was set to arrest and control him, an explosive device in his possession went off,” the ministry said in a press statement.

The explosion took place after police chased the suspect who they believe had planted a bomb near a security staff close to a mosque in Giza on Friday, the statement said. Security officers had been able to defuse that device.

Monday’s explosion that took place near Al Azhar mosque at the heart of ancient Islamic Cairo damaged several shops.

“My shop’s front and windows were destroyed,” said Kareem Sayed Awad, a barbershop owner. “Not only that, but people have died. This is a tourist area and such incidents affect it.”

Egypt’s tourism industry has been struggling to recover from attacks and domestic instability that has hit the country in the years following a 2011 uprising that toppled longtime ruler Hosni Mubarak.

In December three Vietnamese tourists and their Egyptian guide died when a homemade bomb exploded on their bus on the outskirts of Cairo, near the famed pyramids in Giza.

Authorities have been seeking to lure tourists back by touting new archaeological discoveries and bolstering security around archaeological sites and in airports.

Tourism has slowly started picking up. The official statistics agency says tourist arrivals in Egypt in 2017 reached 8.3 million, up from 5.3 million the year before.

But that figure was still far short of the record influx in 2010 when over 14 million visitors flocked to the country.

Egypt has also for years been battling an Islamist insurgency, which deepened following military’s ousting of Islamist president Muhammad Mursi in 2013.

The attacks have been mainly concentrated in the restive northern Sinai Peninsula but have also spread to the mainland.

In February 2018, security forces launched a major anti-militant operation focused on the Sinai Peninsula, aimed at wiping out a local affiliate of the Daesh group.

On Saturday, an attack on an Egyptian army checkpoint in north Sinai left 15 soldiers dead or wounded and seven of the suspected jihadist assailants killed, according to the military.
 

(With AFP)