Russia urges caution on US plan for safe zones in Syria

Internally displaced refugees from al-Bab town gather to receive food aid in Ekhtreen town, northern Aleppo countryside, Syria, on January 21, 2017. Russia and Turkey on Thursday expressed caution over the Trump administration’s interest in setting up safe zones for civilians in Syria. (REUTERS/Khalil Ashawi)
Updated 27 January 2017
0

Russia urges caution on US plan for safe zones in Syria

BEIRUT: The Trump administration’s expressed interest in setting up safe zones for civilians in Syria was greeted Thursday with caution by Russia and Turkey, who have taken the lead in the latest peace efforts to end the Mideast country’s devastating six-year war.
Turkey said it had always supported the idea, but both Ankara and Moscow said such plans would require careful consideration while a senior European Union official said the bloc would consider such plans “when they come.”
The idea of safe zones, proposed by both Republican candidate Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton during the US election campaign, was ruled out by the Obama administration for fear it would bring the United States into direct conflict with Syrian President Bashar Assad and Russia, which has been waging an air campaign to aid Assad’s forces since September 2015.
In October, the Russian military specifically warned the US against striking Syrian government forces, saying its air defense weapons in Syria would fend off any attack.
The recent rapprochement between Russia and Turkey, a key backer of Syrian rebels which now has thousands of troops in northern Syria, in theory makes the creation of safe zones more achievable. So does Trump’s pledge to mend ties with Moscow.
But enforcing them could risk pulling in the US deeper into Syria’s conflict and heightens the risk of an inadvertent clash in Syria’s crowded skies involving warplanes from various countries bombing targets in Syria.
There was no indication on how a safe-zone would look or how it would be enforced.
Asked to comment on a draft executive order that President Trump is expected to sign this week, Russian President Vladimir Putin’s spokesman said it was important to “weigh all possible consequences” of the measure.
Dmitry Peskov said in a conference call with reporters that the US hasn’t consulted with Russia on the subject and noted that “it’s important not to exacerbate the situation with refugees.”
While suspending visas for Syrians and others, the order directs the Pentagon and the State Department to produce a plan for safe zones in Syria and the surrounding area within 90 days. It includes no details.
A Turkish official said his country has always supported the idea of safe zones in Syria but would need to review any US plans before commenting. Foreign Ministry spokesman Huseyin Muftuoglu told reporters that Turkey has “seen the reports on a request for a study on the safe zone,” adding that “what is important is to see the result of these studies.”
He pointed to the Syrian city of Jarablus, near the Turkish border, where thousands of Syrians have returned after Turkish-backed opposition forces drove out the Daesh group, as a good example of what can be achieved.
EU foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini, speaking at a press conference in Beirut on Thursday, said it was too early to comment.
“I will not comment on things ... that are for the moment reports of the beginnings of a process of reflection,” she said. “We will consider plans when they come.”
She said the EU was mainly concerned with pushing a political solution to Syria’s six-year-old war so that a political transition can start so that “every single Syrian inside or outside Syria” can return.
“We need to turn this from a proxy war to a proxy peace and our role is to facilitate,” she said.
Russia has welcomed Trump’s pledge to mend ties with Moscow and potentially partner with it against the Islamic State and other extremist groups.
But Trump has provided few details about how he plans to approach Syria’s complex conflict, and the Kremlin, which was bitterly at odds with the Obama administration, has said that rebuilding trust will take time.
Peskov said no agreement has been reached on a Trump-Putin phone call and that there have been no contacts between their administrations yet beyond routine diplomatic exchanges.
___
Associated Press writers Vladimir Isachenkov in Moscow and Suzan Fraser in Ankara, Turkey, contributed to this report.


Israel gives Bedouin villagers until end of month to leave

Updated 23 September 2018
0

Israel gives Bedouin villagers until end of month to leave

  • Israel’s supreme court on September 5 rejected appeals against demolition, allowing authorities to move ahead
  • ‘No one will leave. We will have to be expelled by force’

JERUSALEM: Israeli authorities issued a notice to residents of a Bedouin village in a strategic spot in the occupied West Bank on Sunday informing them they have until the end of the month to leave.
The fate of Khan Al-Ahmar has drawn international concern, with European countries calling on Israel not to move ahead with plans to demolish it.
Israel’s supreme court on September 5 rejected appeals against demolition, allowing authorities to move ahead.
Israel says the village was built without the proper permits, though it is extremely difficult for Palestinians to receive such permission in that part of the West Bank.
The notice given to the some 200 residents of Khan Al-Ahmar on Sunday says they have until the end of the month to demolish the village themselves.
“Pursuant to a supreme court ruling, residents of Khan Al-Ahmar received a notice today requiring them to demolish all the structures on the site by October 1st, 2018,” a statement from the Israeli defense ministry unit that oversees civilian affairs in the West Bank said.
It did not say what will happen if they refuse to do so. Village residents vowed not to leave despite the notice.
“No one will leave. We will have to be expelled by force,” said village spokesman Eid Abu Khamis, adding that a residents’ meeting would be held later on the issue.
“If the Israeli army comes to demolish, it will only be by force.”
The village is located in a strategic spot east of Jerusalem, near Israeli settlements and along a road leading to the Dead Sea.
There have been warnings that continued settlement building in the area would eventually divide the West Bank in two, dealing a death blow to any remaining hopes of a two-state solution.
Israeli authorities have offered alternative sites for Khan Al-Ahmar residents, but villagers say the first was near a rubbish dump and the latest close to a sewage treatment plant.