Yemen tribesmen kill 13 Al-Qaeda extremists

In this July 6, 2016, Yemeni tribal warriors loyal to the government of President Abedrabbo Mansour Haddi are seen near Aden airport during a clash with suspected jihadists. Tribesmen on Saturday fought Al-Qaeda fighters at a town in nearby Abyan province, killed 13 of the extremists, officials said. (AFP file photo)
Updated 04 February 2017
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Yemen tribesmen kill 13 Al-Qaeda extremists

ADEN, Yemen: Yemeni tribesmen on Saturday killed 13 Al-Qaeda fighters who had slipped back into a southern town hours after pulling out in the face of street protests, a security official said.
The jihadists had reemerged during the night and sought to take control of public buildings in the Abyan province town of Loder, the official said.
They met with fierce resistance from armed residents and withdrew after gunbattles lasting two hours.
Loder was one of three towns in Abyan province that Al-Qaeda fighters entered on Thursday. They withdrew from two of them on Friday in the face of warnings of resistance from local tribes.
Yemen’s powerful and heavily armed tribes play a leading role in the country’s politics and frequently determine local allegiances.
Al-Qaeda has taken advantage of nearly two years of fighting between government forces and Shiite rebels who control the capital Sanaa to entrench its presence in swathes of the south.
But its freedom to operate is constrained by the need to negotiate shifting tribal loyalties.


Australia recognizes west Jerusalem as capital of Israel

Updated 15 December 2018
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Australia recognizes west Jerusalem as capital of Israel

  • The prime minister is also committed to recognizing a future state of Palestine with east Jerusalem as its capital when the city’s status is determined in a peace deal
  • The embassy will be moved to west Jerusalem, and defense and trade offices will also be established

SYDNEY: Australia now recognizes west Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said Saturday, but a contentious embassy shift from Tel Aviv will not occur until a peace settlement is achieved.
Morrison is also committed to recognizing a future state of Palestine with east Jerusalem as its capital when the city’s status is determined in a peace deal.
“Australia now recognizes west Jerusalem — being the seat of the Knesset and many of the institutions of government — is the capital of Israel,” Morrison said in a speech in Sydney on Saturday.
“And we look forward to moving our embassy to west Jerusalem when practical, in support of and after final status of determination,” he said, adding that work on a new site for the embassy was under way.
In the interim, Morrison said, Australia would establish a defense and trade office in the west of the holy city.
“Furthermore, recognizing our commitment to a two-state solution, the Australian government is also resolved to acknowledge the aspirations of the Palestinian people for a future state with its capital in east Jerusalem,” he added.
Both Israel and the Palestinians claim Jerusalem as their capital.
Most foreign nations have avoided moving embassies there to prevent inflaming peace talks on the city’s final status — until US President Trump unilaterally moved the US embassy there earlier this year.
Morrison first floated a shift in foreign policy in October, which angered Australia’s immediate neighbor Indonesia — the world’s most populous Muslim nation.
The issue has put a halt on years-long negotiations on a bilateral trade deal.
Canberra on Friday told its citizens traveling to Indonesia to “exercise a high degree of caution,” warning of protests in the Indonesian capital Jakarta and popular holiday hotspots, including Bali.
Morrison said it was in Australia’s interests to support “liberal democracy” in the Middle East, and took aim at the United Nations he said was a place Israel is “bullied.”