Coup defeat a matter of time, says Yemeni VP

Ali Mohsen al-Ahmar. (Reuters file photo)
Updated 06 February 2017
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Coup defeat a matter of time, says Yemeni VP

ADEN: Yemeni Vice President Lt. Gen. Ali Mohsen Saleh Al-Ahmar said the defeat of the coup in his country is just “a matter of time” given the progress made by the Saudi-led Arab coalition.
“The legitimate Yemeni forces are in a much better position than they were some time ago; they now have full control of most land and maritime territories,” Al-Ahmar said.
“The legitimacy is being restored to the state institutions, especially after the transfer of the Central Bank of Yemen and the Yemeni Parliament’s sessions to the temporary capital of Aden,” he said.
The vice president also said that the legitimate leadership is shouldering its responsibilities toward the Yemeni people, who see the Houthi militias losing by the day, and realize that the coup will inevitably come to an end.
Moreover, salaries of state employees are being paid without discrimination in all provinces, Al-Ahmar pointed out, adding that this is a step in the right direction that makes citizens realize that their leadership is assuming full responsibility.
Al-Ahmar also said that support should be given to President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi’s project of creating a federal state made up of six regions.
“The national army is fighting an unusual battle to restore the state, with an integrated political, military and economic support of the Arab coalition forces,” he said.
In a meeting with the US ambassador to Yemen on Saturday, Al-Ahmar underlined Iran’s abuses of international resolutions and acts of sabotage, including its continuous interventions in Yemen by smuggling weapons and supporting armed groups.
The US official expressed his criticism of the Iranian intervention in Yemen, and he reconfirmed the desire of his country to enhance cooperation with the legitimate government, and strengthen partnerships in the fight against terrorism.


New social deal signed in Morocco, salaries to rise

Updated 26 April 2019
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New social deal signed in Morocco, salaries to rise

  • The minimum wage, currently 2,570 dirhams a month ($266), will be increased by 10 percent over two years from July
  • Last July King Mohammed VI urged the government to take “urgent action” to address social issues

RABAT: The Moroccan government on Thursday announced a “new social deal” with employers and the main labor unions, under which many workers will enjoy a pay rise.
The deal agreed by the General Confederation of Moroccan Businesses (CGEM) and the three main unions — the UMT, UGTM and UNMT — is the fruit of months of negotiations
The minimum wage, currently 2,570 dirhams a month ($266), will be increased by 10 percent over two years from July, except for the agricultural sector.
Government-paid family allowances will also rise.
Meanwhile public sector workers will be given a 300-500 dirham monthly pay increase over three years.
Of Morocco’s main trade unions only the Democratic Labour Confederation has not signed the social deal which, according to the government statement, is aimed at “improving spending power and the social climate.”
Last July King Mohammed VI urged the government to take “urgent action” to address social issues, in particular health and education in the north African country which has been hit by protests over employment and corruption.
Mohammed VI pointed to social support and social protection programs that “overlap each other, suffer from a lack of consistency and fail to effectively target eligible groups.”
After months of stalemate, the dossier was handed to the interior ministry at the beginning of the year and the final rounds of talks were held.
The social unrest began in October 2016 after the death of a fisherman and spiralled into a wave of protests demanding more development in the neglected Rif region and railing against corruption and unemployment.
Morocco is marked by glaring social and territorial inequalities, against a backdrop of high unemployment among young people. In 2018, it was ranked 123rd out of 189 countries and territories on the Human Development Index.