Scientists make thin material that acts as air conditioner

Newly engineered material can cool roofs, structures with zero energy consumption, The team with their glass-polymer hybrid Material. (University of Colorado)
Updated 10 February 2017
0

Scientists make thin material that acts as air conditioner

MIAMI: Scientists have invented a new kind of thin material that can cool a surface against the heat of the sun without using energy or typical air conditioning, a study said Thursday.
The glass-polymer hybrid material measures just 50 micrometers thick — slightly more than aluminum foil — and can be manufactured cheaply, researchers said in the journal Science.
“We feel that this low-cost manufacturing process will be transformative for real-world applications of this radiative cooling technology,” said researcher Xiaobo Yin, an assistant professor at the University of Colorado, Boulder.
Uses for the product could include keeping buildings and other objects cool, as well as extending the life of solar panels.
In the case of thermoelectric power plants, which need massive amounts of water and electricity to maintain the operating temperatures of their machinery, such a film could save resources and money.
Researchers found the material could cool objects by dissipating the sun’s thermal energy in the form of infrared radiation.
In field tests, the material showed a cooling power roughly equivalent to the electricity generated using solar cells for a similar area, and could cool continuously both day and night.
“Just 10 to 20 square meters (yards) of this material on the rooftop could nicely cool down a single-family house in summer,” said co-author Gang Tan, an associate professor in the University of Wyoming’s Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering.
While not on the market yet, researchers said the material is lightweight, easy to fit to curved surfaces, and fairly simple to mass produce.


Russian scientists find defect in new heavy lift space rocket engine

Updated 18 January 2019
0

Russian scientists find defect in new heavy lift space rocket engine

  • The new heavy lift space rocket is capable of carrying more than 20 tons into the orbit
  • Russian President Vladimir Putin said the project is very important for the country's defense

MOSCOW: Scientists have discovered a defect in the engines of Russia’s new flagship heavy lift space rocket that could destroy it in flight, an apparent setback to a project President Vladimir Putin has said is vital for national security.
The Angara A5, which was test-launched in 2014, is being developed to replace the Proton M as Russia’s heavy lift rocket, capable of carrying payloads bigger than 20 tons into orbit. A launch pad for the new rocket is due to open in 2021.
In July, Putin said the Angara A5 had “huge significance” for the country’s defense and called on space agency Roscosmos to work more actively on it and to meet all its deadlines.
The issue with the Angara A5 was brought to attention by scientists at rocket engine manufacturer Energomash in a paper ahead of a space conference later this month.
The paper, reported by RIA news agency on Friday and published online, said the engines of the Angara A5 could produce low frequency oscillations that could ultimately destroy the rocket.
A special valve had been fitted to mitigate the issue, but in some cases the oscillations continued, it said. Energomash did not immediately reply to a request for comment.
Russia’s space program has been dogged by mishaps in recent years, including failed cargo delivery missions into space and the aborted launch in October of the manned Soyuz mission to the International Space Station. Russia’s current heavy lift rocket, the Proton M, has had a nearly 10 percent failure rate in more than 100 launches since it entered service in 2001, creating pressure to reorganize and improve the space program.