Saudi Arabia to address cyber security at the national level

Updated 13 February 2017
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Saudi Arabia to address cyber security at the national level

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia, fueled by its commitment to sustainable growth through economic diversification and technological transformation, climbed four spots to become the 16th biggest economy in the world in 2016.
However, with the widespread use of technology, the risk of cyber threats from hackers, insiders, and foreign governments has reached new heights.
Enhancing the nation’s cybersecurity infrastructure to combat these threats, develop standards, share critical information and educate stakeholders has become a key priority for the Saudi government.
The Ministry of Interior (MOI) represented by National Cyber Security Center (NCSC), in partnership with Naseba, is organizing the Second annual International Cyber Security Conference (ICSC) Feb.27-28 at the Security Forces Officers Club.
The conference is the largest cybersecurity gathering in the Kingdom with over 600 VIPs, CEOs, CIOs, CISOs, IT and Security Managers representing the nation’s critical national infrastructure organizations, private sector and academia.
Committed to supporting the Kingdom’s bid to safeguard its critical networks, providers such as STC, Spire Solutions, TCC, Raytheon, SecurityMatterz, Advanced Electronics Company, Attivo Networks, BT, Fortinet, Innovative Solutions, Kaspersky, Northrop Grumman, PhishMe, Darktrace, Paloalto Networks, Protection Group International, Symantec and VirtualForge will be holding private one to one meetings with the attendees.
Dr. Abbad Alabbad, Communication & Strategic Development executive director, NCSC, said that a key objective of the conference is to “facilitate national, regional and international collaboration between government, industry and critical infrastructure organizations.”
Nicholas Watson, managing director of Naseba, said, “effective information and knowledge sharing within and across industries is crucial to help mitigate cyber threats and attacks. The conference emphasizes this, in addition to facilitating business transactions, partnerships and deals between the key stakeholders and vendors.”
Sanjeev Walia, CEO of Spire Solutions, the lead sponsor of the conference, noted, “At a juncture when the region is targeted by advanced cyber-attacks, cybersecurity is mandatory for every organization and here in Spire Solutions, we work closely with organizations to protect their business by helping them understand, detect and manage cybersecurity threats in an effective way. Our team will demonstrate some of the niche solutions available today such as deception technology, endpoint security, automated threat hunting, and advanced threat exposure management.”


Investigation into alleged mistakes in Yemen find coalition forces acted properly

Updated 17 January 2019
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Investigation into alleged mistakes in Yemen find coalition forces acted properly

JEDDAH: The Joint Incident Assessment Team in Yemen (JIAT) has investigated four allegations made by international governmental and non-governmental organizations and media about mistakes made by coalition forces while carrying out military operations inside Yemen.
JIAT spokesman Mansour Al-Mansour said that the team concluded that the procedures followed by the coalition forces were proper and safe, taking into consideration the rules of engagement, international humanitarian law and the coalition’s own rules.
Team members visited a number of cities in Yemen, including Aden, Lahj and Khor Maksar, during the investigation and spoke to witnesses, victims and their families to gather evidence and establish the facts.
In one of the incidents that was investigated, coalition warship fired on and destroyed a craft in the waters off the Yemeni port of Al-Khokha in September. Al-Mansour said that after examining documents and evidence JIAT had concluded that an alliance ship was escorting and protecting a flotilla of three Saudi merchant ships when, in an area off the port of Al-Khokha, a boat was spotted approaching the convoy at a high speed from the direction of the Yemeni coast.
The escort ship followed the accepted rules of engagement by repeatedly warning the unidentified vessel, using loudspeakers, not to come any closer. When these went unheeded, warning shots were fired but the boat continued to approach.
“On reaching an area that represented a threat to the convoy, the protection ship tackled the boat according to the rules of engagement and targeted it, resulting in an explosion on the boat,” said Al-Mansour. “The protection ship continued escorting the convoy. After the escort task was completed, the protection ship returned to the site of the targeted boat to carry out a search-and-rescue operation for the crew of the target boat but no one was found.”