Saudi Shoura Council considering proposal to reduce time between calls for prayers

Worshippers visit the Prophet's Mosque in Medina, Saudi Arabia. (AP)
Updated 20 February 2017
0

Saudi Shoura Council considering proposal to reduce time between calls for prayers

RIYADH: A proposal by the Shoura Council member Ata Al-Subaiti suggesting the reduction of the period between the first and second call to prayer to five minutes in malls mosques is still being studied by the Ministry of Islamic Affairs, Call and Guidance, Asharq Al-Awsat reported.
Al-Subaiti said that the reduction of time between the first and second call to prayer has multiple considerations. First, in Islam, there is no specific period of time between the two calls to prayer. However, praying on time is better, according to the fatwa by of the late Islamic scholar Muhammad ibn Uthaymeen, stressing that each country determines the time based on its people’s interests. Second, it enables workers in malls and commercial complexes to pray in congregation, taking into account the interests of shoppers and investors.
The Shoura member referred to the short time between the two calls to prayer in the Grand Mosque.
He pointed out that the shops deliberately lock stores a considerable time before the second call to prayer, which could undermine the interests of citizens for over one and a half hour a day, a time considered very important for a country that is still in its first stages in the course of development. 


Grandma Stories: Where the storyteller also listens to the children

Updated 2 min 23 sec ago
0

Grandma Stories: Where the storyteller also listens to the children

DHAHRAN: You can see children forming a gigantic circle and listening carefully when story time starts. Ghadeer Yamani, the founder of Grandma Stories, found her passion for spreading the love of reading among children and delivering values through her storytelling sessions.
The Grandma Stories initiative started six years ago when Yamani returned home after spending years abroad owing to her husband’s work. Yamani has read stories in both Arabic and English for more than 6,000 children of 15 nationalities all over the Kingdom and the Gulf region, including the UAE and Bahrain.
“The idea of Grandma Stories was not an epiphany; it came to me after I saw how reading was a huge part of children’s life abroad. I used to see children reading in libraries, in bus stops, in hospitals — everywhere. I wanted to help spread reading culture in my society.
“I wanted children back home to love reading! And with the support of my husband and family, I think I was able to do this,” Yamani told Arab News.
With the prevalence of national reading competitions, school contests and reading clubs, awareness among families and society members is growing. “The interaction and excitement of families and children are amazing when it comes to story time,” said Yamani.
About the title of her initiative, she said: “When I was a child I used to visit my father’s grandmother in Madinah who had a phenomenal way of telling stories and riddles. I still remember how the entire family would get around her as she started telling her tales, and in an atmosphere filled with love and contentment.
“No one ever wanted her stories to finish and nothing could ever distract us while listening to her. That is exactly how I want children to feel in Grandma Stories story time.”
Storytelling is not only a fun way to ignite imaginations; it also improves children’s verbal and critical thinking abilities. Yamani allows children to criticize the stories by pointing out the strengths and weaknesses of each one. The advancement in such skills is what inspires Yamani and keeps her going.
“The fondest moments throughout my years in storytelling have been when mothers come and tell me how their children used to be shy and reluctant but have started to become fluent and can express themselves well, and that Grandma Stories is the reason for this great progress.”