Saudi Arabia, Japan pledge to strengthen bilateral ties

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King Salman is received by Japan’s Emperor Akihito at the Imperial Palace where he was conferred the Daisy High Medal, in Tokyo on Tuesday. (SPA photos)
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King Salman poses with the Saudi and Japanese delegation to the Saudi-Japan Vision 2030 Business Forum in Tokyo on Tuesday. (AN Photo)
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Updated 14 March 2017
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Saudi Arabia, Japan pledge to strengthen bilateral ties

RIYADH: King Salman was conferred with Japan’s Daisy High Medal by Japanese Emperor Akihito on Tuesday in appreciation of his role as the Custodian of the Two Holy Mosques in Makkah and Madinah.
The Japanese emperor presented the medal to the Saudi king during a reception hosted in his honor at the Imperial Palace in Tokyo, SPA reported.
In his vote of thanks the king through an interpreter told the emperor that he is glad to meet him and visit Japan, to which he called his “second home.”
Moreover, on the third day of the fourth leg of a seven-nation Asian tour, the king attended the Saudi-Japanese Vision 2030 business forum aimed at strengthen bilateral ties.
The king was received at the forum by Minister of Economy and Planning Adel Fakeih and Japanese Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry Hiroshige Seko.
The forum, addressed by Chairman of the Japanese Business Federation Sadayuki Sakakibara, explored economic and investment cooperation between the Kingdom and Japan.
Sakakibara stressed the importance of the Kingdom’s economic role for Japan and the keenness of the Japanese business sector toward the achievement of the strategic economic and developmental objectives of the Saudi-Japanese Vision 2030 that aims to bolster bilateral cooperation.
At the end of the forum, a film on the history of economic relations between the Kingdom and Japan was shown.
Also on Tuesday, the Ministry of Labor and Social Development signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare for cooperation in the areas of work and development of human resources.
The MoU was signed on the sideline of the tour by Minister of Labor and Social Development Ali bin Nasser Al-Ghafis and Japanese Minister of Health, Labor and Social Welfare Yasuhisa Shiozaki.
The Ministry of Education also signed with its Japanese counterpart an executive program agreement for scientific cooperation. It was signed Salim bin Mohammed Al-Malik, adviser and general supervisor of General Department for International Cooperation, and Japanese Vice Minister Komatsu Shinjiro.
The Ministry of Health also signed a memorandum of cooperation with the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare that seeks to establish cooperation on health issues between the two countries. It was signed by Health Minister Tawfiq Al-Rabeeah and his Japanese counterpart Yasuhisa Shiozaki.
Earlier, an MoU was signed by the National Industrial Cluster Development Program (NICDP) and the Toyota Motor Corporation for the feasibility study of an industrial project to produce vehicles and parts in the Kingdom.
The study would take into account the evaluation of development of a local supply base using materials produced by major Saudi companies including SABIC, Maaden, Petro Rabigh.
It further aims to enhance the development and attraction of a Saudi workforce and put in place the adequate training programs.
Abdul Latif Jameel, as a local distributor for Toyota, will be also taking part in the joint feasibility study.
Toyota remains the leader in Saudi and other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) car markets with more than 500,000 units sold in GCC in 2016, according to SPA.

 


Media should not be allowed to ‘sacrifice national values’

Dr. Mohammed bin Abdulkarim Al-Issa, secretary-general of the Muslim World League (MWL), speaks at the Wilton Park Inclusive Citizenship Dialogues forum in Abu Dhabi on Tuesday. (SPA)
Updated 41 min 55 sec ago
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Media should not be allowed to ‘sacrifice national values’

  • Al-Issa called on national integration programs to address segregation, whether educational, religious or ethnic

JEDDAH: The three-day Wilton Park Inclusive Citizenship Dialogues forum began in Abu Dhabi on Monday, gathering religious, intellectual and political figures from across the Middle East.
“It’s wrong to accept from individuals or institutions any justifications that threaten national unity,” said Dr. Mohammed bin Abdulkarim Al-Issa, secretary-general of the Muslim World League (MWL).
“It’s also essential to protect legitimate freedoms, especially ones that promote and support citizenship,” he added.
“We appreciate the concept of national integration ministries in countries of religious and ethnic diversity, but… some of them suffer gaps due to the lack of participation of all national segments in the formulation of their programs,” he said.
“Some of these ministries have a single perspective that they impose on others, which results in accusations of failure or negative bias and racism,” Al-Issa added. “Also, some of these ministries may lack a social presence.”
The media should not be allowed to sacrifice national values, which protect everyone, for the sake of partisan, ideological, ethnic or financial interests, he said.
“Followers of religious and ethnic minorities have sacrificed a lot to show their loyalty to the countries that welcomed them and their parents,” he added.
“But the extremism of the far right came to reinforce prejudices at the expense of those sacrifices and the unity that brings social peace which, if undermined, can threaten the most important pillars of supreme national interest.”
Al-Issa called on national integration programs to address segregation, whether educational, religious or ethnic.