Saudi Arabia halts Brazilian beef and poultry imports over food safety fears

A man inspects pieces of beef at a butchery. (Reuters)
Updated 23 March 2017

Saudi Arabia halts Brazilian beef and poultry imports over food safety fears

DUBAI: Saudi Arabia has stopped beef and poultry imports from four Brazilian companies over concerns about food safety after accusations that individuals had been bribed to allow sales of rotten and salmonella-tainted meats.
Following a two-year investigation of Brazil’s meatpacking industry, police have accused more than 100 people, mostly health inspectors, of taking bribes for allowing the sale of rancid products, falsifying export documents or failing to inspect meatpacking plants.
“This measure was taken in the interest of citizens’ and residents’ safety,” a statement from the Saudi Food and Drug Authority, carried by Saudi Arabia’s official news agency SPA late on Wednesday, said of the halt to imports.
It listed the affected companies as JJZ Alimentos SA, Frango Dm Industria e Comercio de Alimentos Ltda, Seara Alimentos, a subsidiary of JBS, the world’s biggest meatpacking company, and BRF SA, the world’s biggest poultry exporter.
The companies have denied any wrongdoing and authorities have said that no cases of death or illness have been linked to the tainted meat investigation.
Brazilian beef exports to Saudi Arabia in the first 10 months of 2016 totalled almost 24,000 tons, according to a study by Meat and Livestock Australia, a research service.


UN envoy hails 'tireless' Saudi efforts to restore order in south Yemen

Updated 20 August 2019

UN envoy hails 'tireless' Saudi efforts to restore order in south Yemen

  • Griffiths made the comments following ‘positive meeting’ with Saudi official
  • The UN envoy said they agreed on the need for continuous dialogue

JEDDAH: The United Nations envoy to Yemen praised the “tireless role” played by Saudi Arabia in restoring stability to the country’s south.
Griffiths made the comments on Tuesday after a “positive and engaging meeting” with the Kingdom’s Deputy Minister of Defense Khalid bin Salman.
Saudi Arabia and the UAE at the weekend oversaw the withdrawal of southern separatists from positions they had seized from the Yemeni government in the temporary capital Aden.
The Arab coalition, which includes the two Gulf countries, ordered that the fighters stand down and they revert to helping the government fight the Iran-backed Houthi militants, which controls the north.
Griffiths praised the Kingdom’s “tireless role under Khalid bin Salman’s leadership to restore order and stability in south Yemen.” 


“We agreed on the need for continuous dialogue,” he added in a tweet.
Yemen’s latest crisis erupted when southern separatist forces seized the presidential palace and army camps in Aden.
Dozens of people, including civilians, were killed in violent clashes.
Saudi Arabia and the UAE urged Yemenis to observe a cease-fire in Aden and resolve their differences through dialogue.
The separatists, who want an independent south Yemen, had agreed to support the government of President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi to defeat the Houthis from the north who sparked the conflict in 2014 when they seized Sanaa.
But tensions between the separatists and Hadi’s forces have spilled over on a number of occasions in Aden.