Middle East's image abroad to be examined at Arab Media Forum in Dubai

The panel will be moderated by Faisal Abbas, editor in chief of Arab News (top left). Speakers will include (clockwise from top right): Hadley Gamble, Nathan Tek and Mark Donfried.
Updated 01 May 2017
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Middle East's image abroad to be examined at Arab Media Forum in Dubai

JEDDAH: A high-profile media forum to be held in Dubai next week will feature an Arab News panel discussion examining the region’s image abroad.
The Arab Media Forum (AMF), to be held on May 1-2 at the Madinat Jumeirah, is expected to attract prominent international media figures from the Middle East and beyond.
A report titled “The Arab Image in the US” will be unveiled at the event. It is based on an exclusive survey of how the American public views the Arab world, conducted in partnership between Arab News, the Dubai Press Club and research and polling specialist YouGov.
The topic will be discussed during an Arab News panel session featuring: Nathan Tek, US State Department spokesman in the Middle East; Mark Donfried, director of the Institute for Cultural Diplomacy in Berlin; and Hadley Gamble, a reporter and anchor for CNBC covering the Middle East, Africa and US politics.
Faisal Abbas, editor in chief of Arab News, will be moderating the session, which will be held on the second day of the forum.
Promoting civil dialogue
The Dubai Press Club this week revealed the wider agenda for the 16th edition of AMF, which is to be held around the theme “civil dialogue.”
Prominent media leaders, scholars, writers and media experts are set to gather and discuss the importance of dialogue in highlighting peaceful coexistence, tolerance and mutual respect — as well as in condemning racism, hatred and prejudice.
Mona Ghanim Al-Marri, president of Dubai Press Club (DPC) and chair of the AMF Organizing Committee, said that the Arab Media Forum since its inception has had a focus on promoting constructive dialogue.
She noted that this become more important given the regional complexities, for which some people blame the media.
The forum attempts to correct misconceptions about the media and explore ways in which the industry can effectively face the growing challenges in the Arab world and promote a civil dialogue based on respecting pluralism and different ideologies.
Keynote speaker
This year’s AMF is expected to attract over 3,000 participants and experts in the media industry. The UAE’s Minister of State for Tolerance Sheikha Lubna bint Khalid Al-Qasimi will be presenting the keynote address at the opening plenary session on the second day.
Noura Al-Kaabi, minister of state for Federal National Council affairs and chairperson of the Abu Dhabi Media Zone Authority, will present a panel session on “Constructive Dialogue,” while Minister of State for Youth Affairs Shamma Al-Mazrui will be launching a media initiative for Arab youth.
Sultan Ahmed bin Sulayem, chairman of DP World, will speak at a panel discussion titled “The Silk Road”. The session — moderated by Nadine Hani, business news presenter at the Al Arabiya News Channel — will address the role of business in enriching civil dialogue between nations.
International media figures will also be partaking at the annual event, including Richard Buangan, managing director for international media at the US Department of State, who will be talking during a session titled “Successful Political Dialogue.”
Alex Aiken, the UK executive director of government communications, will speak at AMF about the “Dialogue of Tolerance.”


Facebook says it stored ‘millions’ of unencrypted Instagram passwords

Updated 19 April 2019
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Facebook says it stored ‘millions’ of unencrypted Instagram passwords

  • The California firm reaches an estimated 2.7 billion people with its core social network, Instagram and messaging applications

SAN FRANCISCO, US: “Millions” of Instagram users had their passwords stored in unencrypted form on internal servers, Facebook said Thursday, raising its original estimate of tens of thousands.
“We discovered additional logs of Instagram passwords being stored in a readable format. We now estimate that this issue impacted millions of Instagram users,” Facebook said in a blog post.
“We will be notifying these users as we did the others. Our investigation has determined that these stored passwords were not internally abused or improperly accessed,” the social network said.
Facebook, Instagram’s parent company, revealed last month that the unencrypted passwords of hundreds of millions of users had been stored, putting the number of Instagram users affected in the tens of thousands.
The social network’s handling of user data has been a flashpoint for controversy since it admitted last year that Cambridge Analytica, a political consultancy, used an app that may have hijacked the private details of 87 million users.
Facebook has announced a series of moves to tighten handling of data, including eliminating most of its data-sharing partnerships with outside companies.
The California firm reaches an estimated 2.7 billion people with its core social network, Instagram and messaging applications.