Jordan science facility to promote research ties between Mideast countries

The vast white building is home to a synchrotron, a particle accelerator that acts as a powerful microscope. (Photo courtesy: sesame.org.jo)
Updated 16 May 2017
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Jordan science facility to promote research ties between Mideast countries

DUBAI: An advanced research center to be shared by scientists from countries with politically tense relations is set to open in Jordan today.
The facility is called Sesame — Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East – and will be used by researchers from across the region, including Iranians, Israelis and Palestinians.
The facility’s name is a play on the famous phrase “Open Sesame” and implies the beginning of a new era of collaborative scientific research, the BBC reported Tuesday.
The vast white building is home to a synchrotron, a particle accelerator that acts as a powerful microscope by generating intense beams of light
There are about 60 synchrotrons in the world but this will be the first in the Middle East.
Located 35 kilometers north of the capital Amman, the facility is geared toward establishing advanced science in the region, according to Egyptian Dr. Gihan Kamel.
“We are not building a paradise, it’s not an ideal place… But we are creating something, we are giving hope for other people for other generations,” she told the BBC.
The opening ceremony is being attended by Jordanian, Cypriot, Egyptian, Iranian, Pakistani, Palestinian and Turkish delegations and by the heads of UNESCO, CERN and the International Atomic Energy Agency.
However, an Israeli Cabinet minister called off the long-planned visit to attend the ceremony following a spat between the countries over a deadly shooting in Jerusalem.
Science and Technology Minister Ofir Akunis said he was skipping the because of Jordan’s reaction to the killing of a Jordanian who stabbed an Israeli police officer.


Turkey: EU sanctions over gas drilling ‘worthless’

Updated 16 July 2019
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Turkey: EU sanctions over gas drilling ‘worthless’

  • EU foreign ministers said they are suspending talks with Turkey over air transport agreement
  • They backed EU’s proposal to decrease financial assistance to Turkey

ANKARA: Turkey on Tuesday rejected as “worthless” an initial set of sanctions approved by the European Union against Ankara, and vowed to send a new vessel to the eastern Mediterranean to reinforce its efforts to drill for hydrocarbons off the island of Cyprus.
EU foreign ministers on Monday approved sanctions against Turkey over its drilling for gas in waters where EU member Cyprus has exclusive economic rights. They said they were suspending talks on an air transport agreement, as well as high-level Turkey-EU dialogues, and would call on the European Investment Bank to review its lending to the country.
They also backed a proposal by the EU’s executive branch to reduce financial assistance to Turkey for next year. The ministers warned that additional “targeted measures” were being worked on to penalize Turkey, which started negotiations to join the EU in 2005.
Speaking at a news conference in Macedonia, Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu said the sanctions aimed to “appease” Cyprus and were of “no importance.”
“The EU needs us concerning the migration issue or other issues,” he said. “They will come to us and hold contacts; there is no escaping that.”
“They know that the decisions they took cannot be applied,” he said. “They were forced to take the worthless decisions under pressure from the Greek Cypriots and Greece.”
Cavusoglu added: “If you take such decisions against Turkey, we will increase our activities. We have three ships in the eastern Mediterranean, will with send a fourth.”
Earlier, the Turkish Foreign Ministry criticized the EU for ignoring the rights of Turkish Cypriots and accused the 28-nation bloc of “prejudice and bias.”
It added that Turkey was determined to protect its rights and the rights of Turkish Cypriots.
Two Turkish vessels escorted by warships are drilling for gas on either end of ethnically divided Cyprus. A third Turkish exploration ship is also in the area. Turkey insists that it has rights over certain offshore zones and that Turkish Cypriots have rights over others.
Cyprus was split along ethnic lines in 1974 when Turkey invaded in the wake of a coup by supporters of union with Greece. A Turkish Cypriot declaration of independence is recognized only by Turkey, which keeps more than 35,000 troops in the breakaway north. Cyprus joined the EU in 2004, but only the internationally recognized south enjoys full membership benefits.
Cypriot officials accuse Turkey of using the minority Turkish Cypriots in order to pursue its goal of exerting control over the eastern Mediterranean region.
The Cypriot government says it will take legal action against any oil and gas companies supporting Turkish vessels in any repeat attempt to drill for gas. Cyprus has already issued around 20 international arrest warrants against three international companies assisting one of the two Turkish vessels now drilling 68 kilometers off the island’s west coast.