Mosul’s Muslims rebuild church in solidarity with Christians

Muslims residents repairing destroyed church. (Photo curtesy: Facebook/This is Christian Iraq)
Updated 01 June 2017
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Mosul’s Muslims rebuild church in solidarity with Christians

JEDDAH: Muslim neighbors in Iraq helped rebuild a church that had been destroyed by Daesh militants.
In a gesture of solidarity, Iraqi volunteers helped their Christians neighbors, who are still encountering abuse by Daesh, and rebuilt what was once their house of worship.
They wanted to prove that Iraq, their home, welcomes people of all faiths, not only Sunni Muslims.
Mosul residents wanted to show their Christian peers that this city (Mosul) “is your as it’s ours,” and that their religious affiliations do not matter, rather their strength lies in those differences.

While occupying Mosul, Daesh desecrated Christian churches, ancient texts and statues.
The extremists degraded one of the smallest and oldest Christian communities in the world.

In 2014, residents said the militants, who declared a caliphate headed by Abu Bakr Baghdadi, spray-painted Christian houses with the letter “N” in Arabic, which stands for Nasrani, or Christian, to identify them.
In Al-Arabi district, where the Mar George monastery is located, the Chaldean Church was shot up and severely damaged by Daesh militants, and then left in extreme disrepair after the militants were pushed out of the district by Kurdish forces.
After a false rumor spread in the community that Muslims were harassing a Christian family, Muslim volunteers decided to prove the accusations wrong and rebuilt the church from rubble.
In a message of unity, the Iraqi Muslim neighbors were seen cleaning the area and repairing the holy space and rooms. Photos of their work have been shared across Facebook.

 

 


Yemen’s Hodeidah calm after cease-fire takes effect

Updated 18 December 2018
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Yemen’s Hodeidah calm after cease-fire takes effect

  • Yemen’s flashpoint city of Hodeida was calm on Tuesday after the UN-brokered cease-fire started at midnight
  • An agreement reached after talks in Sweden last week calls for the withdrawal of both sides’ forces from Hodeidah

Yemen’s flashpoint city of Hodeida was calm on Tuesday after the UN-brokered cease-fire started at midnight, pro-government sources and residents said.
“There has been complete calm since 03:00 am Yemen time (1200 GMT) in the city of Hodeida,” a military source loyal to the government told AFP on Tuesday.
The cease-fire agreement struck at the UN-sponsored peace talks in Sweden came into effect at midnight Monday.
Residents said that daily fighting would usually be fierce in the evening and at night, before coming to a standstill at dawn.
The two warring sides have however welcomed the truce in the strategic Red Sea province.

The Saudi-led coalition supporting Yemen’s government against Iran-backed Houthi militias “has no intention of violating the agreement ... unless the Houthis violate and dishonor it,” a coalition official said.
An agreement reached after talks in Sweden last week calls for the withdrawal of both sides’ forces from Hodeidah within 21 days and the deployment of international monitors. The Houthis are due to surrender control of the port by midnight on Dec. 31.
UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres is expected to propose a surveillance team of up to to 40 observers, diplomats said.
Hodeidah residents reported sporadic fighting to the east and south of the city on Monday before the cease-fire took hold, and a government military official said a fire had broken out in a factory in the east of the city after airstrikes on Sunday night.

(With AFP)