Terror list: 59 individuals and 12 Qatari-affiliated entities as listed in the Saudi, UAE, Bahraini, Egyptian statement

Yusuf Qaradawi
Updated 09 June 2017
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Terror list: 59 individuals and 12 Qatari-affiliated entities as listed in the Saudi, UAE, Bahraini, Egyptian statement

JEDDAH: A joint statement by the governments of Saudi Arabia, UAE, Bahrain and Egypt have listed 59 individuals and 12 Qatari-affiliated entities on a combined list of what they described as "terrorist supporters."  
 
The joint statement said that the list was written as a result of "Qatar’s actions in contravention of its commitments include supporting and harboring elements and organizations that threaten the National security of other states." 
 
It added that Doha repeatedly ignored "calls for the fulfillment of its obligations under the Riyadh Agreement of 2013 and its associated Implementation Mechanisms, and in addition the Comprehensive Agreement of 2014"
 
The statement said that the majority of entities sanctioned are "linked to Qatar and are a manifestation of a Qatari government policy of duplicity.  One that calls for combating terrorism, whilst simultaneously overseeing the financing, supporting and harboring a vast array of terrorist groups and terrorist financing networks". 
 
List of designated individuals:
 
1. Khalifa Mohammed Turki al-Subaie - Qatari
2. Abdelmalek Mohammed Yousef Abdel Salam - Jordanian
3. Ashraf Mohammed Yusuf Othman Abdel Salam - Jordanian
4. Ibrahim Eissa Al-Hajji Mohammed Al-Baker - Qatari
5. Abdulaziz bin Khalifa al-Attiyah - Qatari
6. Salem Hassan Khalifa Rashid al-Kuwari - Qatari
7. Abdullah Ghanem Muslim al-Khawar - Qatari
8. Saad bin Saad Mohammed al-Kaabi - Qatari
9. Abdullatif bin Abdullah al-Kuwari - Qatari
10. Mohammed Saeed Bin Helwan al-Sakhtari - Qatari
11. Abdul Rahman bin Omair al-Nuaimi - Qatari
12. Abdul Wahab Mohammed Abdul Rahman al-Hmeikani - Yemeni
13. Khalifa bin Mohammed al-Rabban - Qatari
14. Abdullah Bin Khalid al-Thani - Qatari
15. Abdul Rahim Ahmad al-Haram - Qatari 
16. Hajjaj bin Fahad Hajjaj Mohammed al-Ajmi - Kuwaiti
17. Mubarak Mohammed al-Ajji - Qatari
18. Jaber bin Nasser al-Marri - Qatari
19. Yusuf Abdullah al-Qaradawi - Egyptian
20. Mohammed Jassim al-Sulaiti - Qatari
21. Ali bin Abdullah al-Suwaidi - Qatari
22. Hashem Saleh Abdullah al-Awadhi - Qatari
23. Ali Mohammed Mohammed al-Salabi - Libyan
24. Abdelhakim Belhadj - Libyan
25. Mahdi Harati - Libyan
26. Ismail Muhammad Mohammed al-Salabi - Libyan
27. Al-Sadiq Abdulrahman Ali al-Ghuraini - Libyan
28. Hamad Abdullah Al-Futtais al-Marri - Qatar
29. Mohamed Ahmed Shawky Islambouli - Egyptian
30. Tariq Abdelmagoud Ibrahim al-Zomor - Egyptian
31. Mohamed Abdelmaksoud Mohamed Afifi - Egyptian
32. Mohamed el-Saghir Abdel Rahim Mohamed - Egyptian
33. Wajdi Abdelhamid Mohamed Ghoneim - Egyptian
34. Hassan Ahmed Hassan Mohammed Al Dokki Al Houti - UAE
35. Hakem al-Humaidi al-Mutairi - Saudi / Kuwaiti
36. Abdullah Mohammed Sulaiman al-Moheiseni - Saudi
37. Hamed Abdullah Ahmed al-Ali - Kuwaiti
38. Ayman Ahmed Abdel Ghani Hassanein - Egyptian
39. Assem Abdel-Maged Mohamed Madi - Egyptian
40. Yahya Aqil Salman Aqeel - Egyptian
41. Mohamed Hamada el-Sayed Ibrahim - Egyptian
42. Abdel Rahman Mohamed Shokry Abdel Rahman - Egyptian
43. Hussein Mohamed Reza Ibrahim Youssef - Egyptian
44. Ahmed Abdelhafif Mahmoud Abdelhady - Egyptian
45. Muslim Fouad Tafran - Egyptian
46. Ayman Mahmoud Sadeq Rifat - Egyptian
47. Mohamed Saad Abdel-Naim Ahmed - Egyptian
48. Mohamed Saad Abdel Muttalib Abdo Al-Razaki - Egyptian
49. Ahmed Fouad Ahmed Gad Beltagy - Egyptian
50. Ahmed Ragab Ragab Soliman - Egyptian
51. Karim Mohamed Mohamed Abdel Aziz - Egyptian
52. Ali Zaki Mohammed Ali - Egyptian
53. Naji Ibrahim Ezzouli - Egyptian
54. Shehata Fathi Hafez Mohammed Suleiman - Egyptian
55. Muhammad Muharram Fahmi Abu Zeid - Egyptian
56. Amr Abdel Nasser Abdelhak Abdel-Barry - Egyptian
57. Ali Hassan Ibrahim Abdel-Zaher - Egyptian
58. Murtada Majeed al-Sindi - Bahraini
59. Ahmed Al-Hassan al-Daski - Bahraini
 
List of entities:
 
1. Qatar Volunteer Center - Qatar
2. Doha Apple Company (Internet and Technology Support Company) - Qatar
3. Qatar Charity - Qatar
4. Sheikh Eid al-Thani Charity Foundation (Eid Charity) - Qatar
5. Sheikh Thani Bin Abdullah Foundation for Humanitarian Services - Qatar
6. Saraya Defend Benghazi - Libya
7. Saraya al-Ashtar - Bahrain
8. February 14 Coalition - Bahrain
9. The Resistance Brigades - Bahrain
10. Hezbollah Bahrain - Bahrain
11. Saraya al-Mukhtar - Bahrain
12. Harakat Ahrar Bahrain - Bahrain Movement

 


Erdogan declares victory in Turkish presidential election

Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan waves to supporters as he leaves his residence in Istanbul, Turkey on Sunday. (REUTERS)
Updated 24 June 2018
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Erdogan declares victory in Turkish presidential election

  • Erdogan has just under 53 percent in the presidential poll while Ince, of the secular Republican People’s Party (CHP), was on 31 percent, state-run Anadolu news agency said, based on a 96 percent vote count
  • The pro-Kurdish Peoples’ Democratic Party (HDP) was polling 11 percent, well over the 10 percent minimum threshold needed to win 46 seats, which would make it the second largest opposition party in the new chamber

ISTANBUL: Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Sunday declared victory in a tightly-contested presidential election, extending his 15-year grip on power in the face of a revitalized opposition.
Turkish voters had for the first time cast ballots for both president and parliament in the snap polls, with Erdogan looking for a first round knockout and an overall majority for his ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP).
The stakes in this election are particularly high as the new president is the first to enjoy enhanced powers under a new constitution agreed in an April 2017 referendum strongly backed by Erdogan.
Erdogan was on course to defeat his nearest rival Muharrem Ince with more than half the vote without needing a second round, initial results showed.
“The unofficial results of the elections have become clear. According to these... I have been entrusted by the nation with the task and duties of the presidency,” Erdogan said at his Istanbul residence.
He added that the alliance led by the AKP had won the majority in parliament.
Erdogan has just under 53 percent in the presidential poll while Ince, of the secular Republican People’s Party (CHP), was on 31 percent, state-run Anadolu news agency said, based on a 96 percent vote count.
The figures could yet change as final ballot boxes are opened.
But celebrations were already beginning outside Erdogan’s residence in Istanbul and AKP headquarters in Ankara, with crowds of flag-waving supporters, AFP correspondents said.
Trailing were Meral Aksener of the nationalist (Iyi) Good Party with over seven percent and Selahattin Demirtas of the pro-Kurdish Peoples’ Democratic Party (HDP) with almost eight percent.
A count of almost over 95 percent for the parliamentary election also showed that Erdogan’s AKP — along with its Nationalist Movement Party (MHP) allies — were well ahead and set for an overall majority.
The pro-Kurdish Peoples’ Democratic Party (HDP) was polling 11 percent, well over the 10 percent minimum threshold needed to win 46 seats, which would make it the second largest opposition party in the new chamber.
Turnout in the presidential election was almost 88 percent, according to the figures published by Anadolu.

Erdoogan had faced an energetic campaign by Ince, who has rivalled the incumbent’s charisma and crowd-pulling on the campaign trail, as well as a strong opposition alliance in the legislative poll.
Ince vowed to spend the night at the headquarters of Turkey’s election authority in Ankara to ensure a fair count and urged supporters to stay in polling stations until the final vote was counted.
The CHP said it had recorded violations in particular in the southeastern province of Sanliurfa, although Erdogan insisted, after voting himself, there was no major problem.
“I will protect your rights. All we want is a fair competition. Have no fear and don’t believe in demoralizing reports,” Ince said after polls closed.
Several world leaders supportive of Erdogan, including Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev and Qatari Emir Tamim bin Hamad Al-Thani, called to congratulate him on his “victory,” the presidency said.

Erdogan has overseen historic change in Turkey since his Islamic-rooted ruling party first came to power in 2002 after years of secular domination. But critics accuse the Turkish strongman, 64, of trampling on civil liberties and autocratic behavior.
Although Erdogan dominated airtime on a pliant mainstream media, Ince finished his campaign with eye-catching mass rallies, including a mega meeting in Istanbul on Saturday attended by hundreds of thousands of people.
The president has for the last two years ruled under a state of emergency imposed in the wake of the 2016 failed coup, with tens of thousands arrested in an unprecedented crackdown which cranked up tensions with the West.
Erdogan, whose mastery of political rhetoric is acknowledged even by critics, has won a dozen elections but campaigned against the backdrop of increasing economic woes.
Inflation has zoomed well into double digits — with popular concern over sharp rises in staples like potatoes and onions — while the Turkish lira has lost some 25 percent in value against the US dollar this year.
But the opposition has lambasted the uneven nature of the poll, which saw state-controlled television ignore Ince’s giant rally in Istanbul on the eve of the election.
And in a situation labelled as blatant unfairness by activists, the HDP’s Demirtas has campaigned from a prison cell after his November 2016 arrest on charges of links to outlawed Kurdish militants.
After casting his ballot in his jail in the northwestern region of Edirne, Demirtas wrote on Twitter: “I wish that everyone uses their vote for the sake of the future and democracy of the country.”