Moody’s downgrades Bahrain rating to B1

Bahrain’s government debt burden and debt affordability would deteriorate significantly over the coming two to three years, Moody’s said. (AFP)
Updated 29 July 2017
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Moody’s downgrades Bahrain rating to B1

DUBAI: Moody’s Investors Service downgraded the Bahrain’s long-term issuer rating to B1 from Ba2, and maintained its negative outlook for the country.
“The credit profile of the Bahraini government will continue to weaken materially in the coming years, predominantly because despite some fiscal reform efforts there is a lack of a clear and comprehensive consolidation strategy,” the credit ratings agency said in its rationale for the downgrade.
It also expected that Bahrain’s government debt burden and debt affordability would deteriorate significantly over the coming two to three years.
Moody’s also lowered Bahrain’s long-term foreign-currency bond ceiling to Ba2 from Baa3 and long-term foreign-currency deposit ceiling to B2 from Ba3.
The negative outlook reflects continued downside risks to the rating, which manifest themselves in heightened government and external liquidity risks, Moody’s said on Friday.
The ratings agency also noted that although the Gulf state has benefited from support its neighbors during previous periods of stress, such “support at this
juncture lacks clarity, both in its form and timeliness.”
Moody’s like added that while initial steps have been taken toward fiscal consolidation — including subsidy reforms for fuel and utility tariffs, the streamlining of government entities, increasing taxes, and targeting a cost recovery in the provision of government services — the country still lacks a clear and comprehensive fiscal strategy given difficult timing in introducing it.
As the country manages growing domestic political and social tensions that render difficult the introduction of unpopular fiscal measures, Moody’s said.
Bahrain’s dependence on debt funding to finance its large fiscal deficit, and considering its limited sovereign wealth fund assets it can draw on, Moody’s raised doubts if the country can return to more sustainable government debt levels.
Fiscal deficits would stay in double-digits in 2017 and 2018, and narrow only gradually over the following years, the ratings agency said.
Moody’s also on Friday downgraded Oman’s long-term issuer and senior unsecured bond ratings to Baa2 from Baa1, and changed the outlook to negative from stable, citing the country’s limited progress in addressing vulnerabilities to the weaker oil price environment.
Moody’s expects Oman to be continually reliant on oil for government revenues, at an average of 71 percent over coming the years.


Saudi Arabia’s SABIC and NCB sign deal to finance small businesses

The National Commercial Bank struck the agreement with SABIC. (Reuters)
Updated 19 November 2018
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Saudi Arabia’s SABIC and NCB sign deal to finance small businesses

  • The move will help develop local industries through financing and refinancing entrepreneurs

LONDON: The National Commercial Bank (NCB) has signed a memorandum of understanding with the Saudi Basic Industries Corporation (SABIC) to help boost the financing of small and medium enterprises (SMEs).

The move will help develop local industries through financing and refinancing entrepreneurs, Asharq Al-Awsat newspaper reported.

The agreement will enable entrepreneurs and small and medium enterprises (SMEs) to obtain support and funding from NCB at preferential rates.

In addition, NCB will provide other services, including training and educational and awareness courses.

NCB, also known as Al-Ahli Bank, recently organized three workshops geared toward SMEs, covering areas such as credit approvals, financing and trade.